Kevin D. Slattery Esq.

Kevin D. Slattery Esq.

Kevin D. Slattery, P.A.
  • Immigration Law
  • Connecticut, DC, Florida
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Summary

KEVIN D SLATTERY obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree in both Political Science and French from the University of Notre Dame in 1997. While at the University of Notre Dame, he was an active member of both the Notre Dame Council on International Business Development and the national political science honor society Pi Sigma Alpha. During his time at Notre Dame, he also studied abroad for one academic year at the Université Catholique de l’Ouest in Angers, France. In 1998, Mr. Slattery participated in the NAFTA Leaders Internship Program at the Washington Center for Internships & Academic Seminars in Washington, DC, partaking in a series of lectures and seminars designed to address the policy implications of the North American Free Trade Agreement. In 2003, he obtained his law degree from the University of Florida College of Law, where he was an active member of both Florida Law Review and the international legal fraternity Phi Delta Phi. While in law school, Mr. Slattery was the recipient of the International Human Rights Law Book Award as well as the Legal Drafting Book Award. He also spent an academic summer abroad through the university’s law program at the Université de Montpellier in Montpellier, France. Following completion of his legal studies, Mr. Slattery served as a judicial law clerk at the Connecticut Appellate Court. In 2006, Mr. Slattery opened Kevin D. Slattery, P.A., a law firm dedicated to the practice of immigration law. The firm is located in Tampa, FL, and offers assistance in family-based and employment-based immigration matters as well as in removal defense. Mr. Slattery is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association and is admitted to practice law in Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Florida, the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut, the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit.

Practice Area
  • Immigration Law
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Connecticut
DC
Florida
11th Circuit
United States District Court for the District of Connecticut
United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida
United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
  • French: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Immigration Attorney
Kevin D. Slattery, P.A.
- Current
Education
University of Florida
J.D. | Law
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Honors: J.D., Cum Laude; Legal Drafting Book Award, Fall 2002; International Human Rights Law Book Award, Spring 2003
Activities: Law Review; Phi Delta Phi (legal fraternity), Philanthropy Officer; American Bar Association (student member); American Immigration Lawyers Association (student member); Association of Trial Lawyers of America (student member); John Marshall Bar Association (student bar association - member); Summer Law Program in Montpellier, France
University of Notre Dame
B.A. | Government & International Relations; French
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Honors: B.A., Cum Laude; Pi Sigma Alpha (national political science honor society)
Activities: Notre Dame Council on International Business Development; Stage Universite Notre-Dame en France (SUNDEF) XXIX
l'Université Catholique de l'Ouest, Angers, France
Certificat de Langue Française; Certificat de Langue et de Civilisation Françaises (1995) | General undergraduate studies during academic year abroad
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Professional Associations
Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Tampa Bay
Member
- Current
French American Chamber of Commerce of Tampa Bay
Member
- Current
American Immigration Lawyers Association
Member
- Current
Publications
Articles & Publications
Employment Discrimination Law, 4th Ed., Vol. 1, Chapter 23 - Employment Agencies (Contributor)
BNA Books
Speaking Engagements
Immigration Law, OUT of the Closet and IN Your Office, Stetson University College of Law
Florida Association of LGBT Lawyers & Allies, Inc., LGBT Bar Association of Tampa Bay, Inc.
What’s it really like being an immigrant?, St. Petersburg Conference on World Affairs, USF St. Petersburg
Here’s a tweet: build that wall and make them pay., St. Petersburg Conference on World Affairs, USF St. Petersburg
Citizens of God's Kingdom: Immigration and our Christian Faith, St. Jerome Catholic Church, Largo, FL
Family Law Bootcamp, 28th Annual American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) Central Florida Chapter (CFC) Conference, Clearwater Beach, FL
American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) Central Florida Chapter (CFC)
Civil Liberties and the Trump Administration, Panel Discussion, USF St. Petersburg
USFSP Honors Program, West Central Florida Cluster of Unitarian Universalist Congregations, ACLU of Florida
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Legal Answers
149 Questions Answered

Q. If my dad was arrested under criminal charges, what are the chances of having to go in front of an immigration lawyer?
A: If your father is undocumented, in any type of lawful nonimmigrant status, or even a U.S. Legal Permanent Resident and is facing a pending criminal charge, it is advisable that he consult with a competent immigration attorney who can advise him (and possibly also his criminal defense attorney if that attorney does not practice immigration law) on the potential negative immigration consequences of pleading to or being convicted of certain criminal charges. If your father is in criminal detention, some immigration attorneys make jailhouse visits.
Q. My husband has a immagration hold and is married to a American citizen how do i get the immagration hold lifted
A: Consult with a competent immigration attorney. Sometimes if there is an ICE hold on the individual at the criminal detention facility, it may be wise to NOT pay the bond set by the criminal court judge in connection with the criminal case. Doing so could hasten when ICE takes the individual. If ICE refuses to set an immigration bond or release him on his own recognizance, then he may be transferred to an immigration detention facility far from where he and his family live normally. It is sometimes easier for the immigration attorney to access the client while he remains in criminal custody and gives the attorney more time to prepare for what is likely a removal (deportation) case to come. Consult with an experienced, competent immigration attorney.
Q. My boyfriend is a PR of the USA. He was charged with a criminal offence back in 2002. He recently tried to visit me in
A: He, or someone on his behalf if he is detained, should likely contact an immigration lawyer to schedule a consultation. It would also be best to forward to the prospective attorney for your boyfriend copies of all criminal case documentation that you, your boyfriend or the family may have. This will help the attorney to analyze the situation more quickly. If he is in an immigration detention center, it may be best to look for an immigration attorney who is close in proximity to the detention center. Consider looking for an attorney who is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) by using this AILA search website: https://www.ailalawyer.com/
Q. Can my partner come to America (he’s British) to marry while on visa waiver program ? He does not intend on staying
A: Although it is permissible to marry one while in the United States in visitor status and to thereafter depart, at that point the U.S. Citizen Spouse would need to file a Petition for Relative case. Following approval thereof, the foreign national spouse would pursue an immigrant visa case through the National Visa Center and U.S. Embassy abroad. The petition and visa process in its entirety could take approximately 10 - 12 months. If your goal is to get the foreign national prospective spouse here legally, as quickly as possible and on a permanent basis, consider pursuing the fiance(e) visa instead. You should likely schedule a consultation with a competent immigration attorney who can flush out all possible issues as well as offer you any/all viable options. Good luck.
Q. my girlfriend is ready to fly to Orlando area from Athens Greece with her minor children, to get married and live here
A: You should consult with a competent immigration attorney who can advise you on the proper way(s) by which she can immigrate. If one is using a nonimmigrant visa (such as B-1/2 or Visa Waiver Program/ESTA) with the preconceived intent of immigrating permanently, the immigration service could (and likely would) perceive that as fraud. The Department of State's Foreign Affairs Manual does speak of the acceptability of entering the U.S. in visitor status with the purpose of marrying here SO LONG AS the intent is to thereafter leave and await processing of an immigrant visa case through the U.S. Embassy abroad. (Note: Even this may pose problems if the port-of-entry officer doesn't believe she intends to return abroad.) If her intent is to come to the U.S. to marry and then pursue adjustment of status from within the U.S., then the K-1 fiancee visa process is likely the way to go. Again, it would be wise for you to schedule a consultation with an experienced immigration attorney.
Q. In the US naturalization process, if one was outside US for over 1 year, does the 5 year clock starts from scratch?
A: Barring your wife having submitted and received an approval of an Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes (Form N-470), your wife would need to wait to apply for citizenship four years and one day after returning to the United States from her trip that lasted more than 1 year. The reentry permits may excuse your and your wife's absence of more than 1 year in terms of you not being accused of having abandoned your permanent resident status, but that does not prevent a break in continuity of residence, another requirement for naturalization. You, given that you may not have had a continuous 1 year absence, may possibly qualify sooner - assuming you meet other total physical presence time requirements. Even if you do not have a single absence of 1 year or longer, absences in excess of 6 months but less than 1 year create a rebuttable presumption that you have broken continuity of residence. I would recommend that you consult with a competent immigration attorney who can discuss the particulars of your case with you. At first glance, though, you seem to be in a better position than your wife.
Q. Is it possible for a U.S. citizen to marry a Mexican citizen, and for said Mexican citizen to gain legal residency?
A: Whether the Mexican Citizen in question will gain legal residency requires a case specific analysis, including an analysis of any prior negative immigration history, prior criminal history, etc. Absent serious negative immigration history and absent serious prior criminal history, yes, it may be possible for the individual to gain legal residency. If the individual is not eligible for adjustment of status, then he or she may need to pursue an immigrant visa consular processing case. A consultation with a competent immigration attorney is likely a good idea.
Q. I'm married with a American citizen, I would like to apply to the green card, what is the right form to fill up?
A: First, congratulations on your marriage! Next, as has been pointed out by others who have responded to your question, it is often a good idea to speak with a competent immigration attorney at a consultation. The attorney will ask you a variety of questions to determine what is the best course of action as well as to determine whether there exist any pitfalls about which you may be unaware. For example, past negative immigration history or past negative criminal history can often complicate matters. The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) has a website through which you can find, if you are so inclined, an AILA member attorney who is close to you. www.ailalawyer.org Some attorneys, like myself, also offer online consultations for those who are not local to the geographical area in which the attorney is located. Good luck to you!
Q. Should my 23 yr old nephew go to the green card interview with mom since he was arrested for smoking weed in 12/2017?
A: Any time an individual seeking some type of U.S. immigration benefit has past criminal history, it is wise to bring copies of the criminal case documents to an immigration attorney for analysis. Without seeing those documents and without asking a series of questions, it is impossible to say one way or the other whether the situation you are describing above will pose a problem. Schedule a consultation with a competent, experienced immigration attorney. Some offer online Skype consultations.
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Kevin D. Slattery, P.A.
4860 West Gandy Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33611
USA
Telephone: (813) 839-7474