Jonathan C. Puth

Jonathan C. Puth

Owner, Correia & Puth, PLLC
  • Employment Law, Civil Rights
  • DC, Maryland
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Summary

Jonathan C. Puth is a founding member of Correia & Puth and an advocate for the civil rights of employees. Mr. Puth represents targets of sexual harassment, workplace discrimination, whistleblower retaliation, and employees with claims for wages, commissions, and contract rights. Mr. Puth represents transgender employees subjected to workplace discrimination and others facing discrimination and retaliation because of who they are. Mr. Puth also negotiates severance agreements and employment contracts, and severance negotiations. Mr. Puth served as counsel to the plaintiff class in Hartman v. Powell, a gender discrimination class awarded the largest employment discrimination award in the history of the Civil Rights Act ($565 million), and Mr. Puth was awarded the 2000 Trial Lawyer of the Year award by Trial Lawyers for Public Justice for his work on that landmark case. Mr. Puth has for years been selected for inclusion by Super Lawyers and by Best Lawyers for his work representing employees in the Washington, DC region, and is awarded the highest attorney peer review rating by Martindale-Hubbell. His firm Correia & Puth is named by U.S. News and World Report its highest rating for Best Law Firms in Washington DC, which also ranks the firm nationally. From the start of his career, Mr. Puth has devoted his practice to the representation of employees, not employers, in claims of sex harassment, whistleblower retaliation, discrimination, wage and commission theft, severance negotiations, contract disputes, and employee counseling. Mr. Puth is past President of the Metropolitan Washington Employment Lawyers Association (MWELA), a voluntary bar association of over 350 members dedicated to the representation of employees and to the advancement of employee rights. Mr. Puth is admitted to practice before the state courts and federal courts of the District of Columbia and Maryland, and the United States Supreme Court.

Practice Areas
  • Employment Law
  • Civil Rights
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
DC
Maryland
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Owner
Correia & Puth, PLLC
- Current
Education
Georgetown University Law Center
J.D.
-
Awards
Trial Lawyer of the Year
Trial Lawyers for Public Justice
AV Preeminent
Martindale Hubbel
Top Rated Employment & Labor Attorney
Super Lawyers
Civil Rights, Employment Law - Individuals, Litigation - Labor & Employment
Best Lawyers
Best Law Firms, Correia & Puth, PLLC
US News and World Report
Professional Associations
District of Columbia Bar # 439241
Member
Current
Trial Lawyers Assocaition of Metropolitan Washington, DC
Member
- Current
American Association of Justice
Member
- Current
Public Justice
Member
- Current
Metropolitan Washington Employment Lawyers Association
Board Member
- Current
National Employment Lawyers Association
Member
- Current
Metropolitan Washington Employment Lawyers Association
President
-
Websites & Blogs
Website
Legal Answers
7 Questions Answered

Q. Can I still file with the eeoc if I passed the 180 day limit to file with the mchr (Maryland)
A: Yes, you have 300 days to file with the EEOC in Maryland, where there is a state deferral agency. If you are referring to Montgomery County office of human rights you should also be timely. By the way, if you're late with a filing it doesn't matter usually if it's one day late or 100. Either way in most instances you're out of luck.
Q. I am 14 years old. Work at a tutoring place in Maryland. I make 9 an hour (which is less than the state minimum wage)
A: Your employer may not be required to pay you minimum wage because of your age and the nature of the work. The state Department of Labor that administers the minimum wage indicates that workers under 16 working less than 20 hours a week. https://www.dllr.state.md.us/labor/wages/wagehrfacts.shtml It is illegal to pay employees differently by gender, so if the other employees getting paid differently are of a different gender or gender identity that would be illegal if you are doing equal work. https://www.dllr.state.md.us/forms/equalpay.pdf Importantly, that same law makes it illegal for your employer to take action against you, like firing, because you discussed wages with other employees. To make that a fireable offense is illegal under Maryland law. https://www.dllr.state.md.us/labor/wages/wagehrfacts.shtml
Q. Can I be denied a chair at work at 37 weeks pregnant although I've provided a doctor's note stating I'm pregnant?
A: You should follow your employer's direction to provide a medical basis for your request for a chair. Accommodations for pregnancy may be covered by the Pregnancy Discrimination Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, but your employer does have a right to seek medical support for your accommodations request. If you obtain a doctor's note indicating that because of your pregnancy you need to sit then your employer should be obligated to accommodate you. If they don't even after you provide the doctor's note, then you should contact a lawyer.
Q. Need a week off for surgery. Have no accrued PTO left. Employer says I'm not allowed to take unpaid time off.
A: Because you have a serious health condition you should be covered by the federal Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA), but that requires that your employer have 50 employees within 75 miles of the worksite. If there are not 50 employees but there are at least 15 employees, the Maryland state FMLA protects you to take 15 weeks of leave (not necessarily paid). Thus if there are that many employees you should be able to let your employer know that you are entitled to take unpaid leave for your surgery. It is also possible that the health condition you describe qualifies as a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act and state law as well, though both require 15 employees in the company. If you are working in Prince Georges, Montgomery, or Howard County, however, then you are covered when there is at least 1 employee. Under all circumstances should ask your employer for leave as an accommodation in order to have and recover from surgery for a disabling medical condition.
Q. I was sexually harassed at work. What can I do?
A: The best thing to do would be to discuss it with an experienced employment attorney. You may contact me at jputh@correiaputh.com. Other lawyers who regularly represent employees are listed at www.mwela.org. I recommend you act promptly to ensure that any possible legal claims are preserved, as statutes of limitations for these types of claims can be short.
Q. Hello, I am a deli owner and one of my employee sued me for minimum wage and overtime.
A: An employer may not get out of legal requirements to pay minimum wage and overtime by agreement with employees.
Q. Can I sue a company because it is retaliating against me by providing lies to future prospective employers?
A: If you complained of discrimination or harassment based on your ethnicity, yes, your employer may be held liable for retaliation if that's what motivated them to do so. The Supreme Court decided that issue in Robinson v. Shell Oil Co., 519 U.S. 337 (1997).
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Contact & Map
Jonathan C. Puth
Correia & Puth, PLLC
1775 K St., N.W., Suite 600
Washington, DC 20006
USA
Telephone: (202) 602-6500