Jeff Germany

Jeff Germany

  • Business Law, Personal Injury
  • Arkansas, Tennessee
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Summary

Jeff Germany has extensive experience in the area of civil litigation. He concentrates his practice in the areas of commercial litigation, creditor's rights, construction defect litigation and catastrophic injury litigation.

Jeff is a graduate of the University of Arkansas' Walton College of Business Administration and the University of Arkansas' School of Law. He was admitted to practice in Arkansas in 1985 and in Tennessee in 1986.

Jeff has served as a member of the board of directors of the Chickasaw Council of the Boy Scouts of America, the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, East Memphis Young Life and the Touchdown Club of Memphis. He has also served as an instructor of business law at Chrichton College. When not practicing law, Jeff serves as the head coach of a local high school football team.

Practice Areas
  • Business Law
  • Personal Injury
Additional Practice Areas
  • Creditor Rights
  • Construction Defects
Fees
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Available upon request.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Arkansas
Tennessee
Education
University of Arkansas - Fayetteville
B.S. | Business Administration
- present
Activities: Razorbacks Football Team, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Campus Crusade for Christ
University of Arkansas - Fayetteville
J.D. | Law
-
Publications
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Legal Answers
2 Questions Answered

Q. Do Do I need a lawyer to sue a person that owes me money for labor I did for them?
A: If you are an individual you can represent yourself in an action to recover the money you are owed for labor performed. If you performed the work on behalf of a legal entity (corporation, LLC, etc.) you will likely not be allowed to represent your entity (pro se/without a lawyer) because you will be representing a client without a license. I have, however, seen some courts in Tennessee that allowed an owner to act on behalf of his entity in his/her capacity as an officer of the entity. Although you can serve as your own lawyer, you may find yourself at a disadvantage (depending upon the facts of your dispute) especially if the party you are suing is represented by an experienced attorney.
Q. Is unfinished labor a chancery or criminal court issue?
A: It is likely a civicl matter. The Chancery Court routinely handles contract disputes. Unfinished labor would only become a criminal issue under limited circumstances. For example, a party that defrauded an owner by taking funds with no intent to perform the related work might be subjected to a criminal claim.
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Contact & Map
45 North Third Avenue
Second Floor
Memphis, TN 29767
USA
Telephone: (901) 522-0050