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David L. Leon

David L. Leon

David L. Leon, PC, Dallas, Texas
  • Business Law, Communications & Internet Law, Estate Planning...
  • New York, Texas
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Summary

We are a Dallas, Texas based firm offering business (formation, franchises, contracts, buying and selling), real estate (deeds, title), estate planning (wills, trusts, powers of attorney), probate (letters testamentary, small estate affidavit, heirship affidavit), and immigration (family and business.) English, Spanish and German services offered.

David L. Leon graduated from Southern Methodist University in 1992, and SMU Law in 1996 and is licensed in Texas and New York.

Practice Areas
  • Business Law
  • Communications & Internet Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Real Estate Law
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    Free telephone consultation.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
    American Express, Visa, MasterCard, Discover
  • Contingent Fees
    Contingent fees available in certain personal injury and insurance matters.
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Rates $275-325/hr. Retainers vary by matter.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
New York
Texas
Languages
  • German: Spoken, Written
  • Spanish
Professional Experience
Member
Texas Trial Lawyers Association
- Current
Education
Southern Methodist University
Doctor of Jurisprudence/Juris Doctor (J.D.)
Professional Associations
Texas State Bar # 00796946
Member
- Current
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Legal Answers
4 Questions Answered

Q. Does a will have to read to the beneficiaries before it is probated in Texas.
A: The will doesn't have to be read to the beneficiaries. However, the Probate code requires that all beneficiaries are to receive a copy of the will once it's filed for probate.
Q. Who do i file my parents last will?
A: If your parent is alive, then there's no need to "file" the will. Your parent has the option of placing it with the county clerk's office for safekeeping. Otherwise, your parent should just keep it in a safe place where the named executor can find it when the time arises. If your parent is deceased, then you can file the will for probate. The counties you can choose from: (1) the county where your parent lived, (2) the county where your parent died or (3) the county where you parent owned property.
Q. My sister and I bought a house together. She paid the down payment; I pay the mortgage. She died. Is the house mine now?
A: Not necessarily. If the house was TITLED as "joint tenancy with rights of survivorship" when you bought it then yes, the house is yours. If not, then the house is partly yours, and you share that with the heirs of your sister's estate. The heirs could be listed in a will (if she had one), or her heirs at law.
Q. Does the executor of a Will have absolute power on estate management even though my name is mentioned on Will too?
A: If the Will provides for an independent administration, then yes, he can manage the estate as he sees fit. However, he still owes a fiduciary duty to the heirs. This means that he can't steal estate assets, nor can he self deal.
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Contact & Map
Dallas Office
3500 Oak Lawn Ave., Ste. 110
Dallas, TX 75219
USA
Telephone: (214) 696-0021