Timothy V. Kassouni

Timothy V. Kassouni

The Experience to Deliver Results
  • Appeals & Appellate, Business Law, Construction Law...
Badges
Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&ASocial Media
Summary

Sacramento attorney Timothy Kassouni founded Kassouni Law on the belief that property rights and personal freedom are intertwined. He passionately considers it his duty and mission to rigorously defend property rights against government and private abuse. Mr. Kassouni has many years of experience litigating against private and public entities at all levels of court, including the United States Supreme Court, the California Supreme Court, the California Court of Appeal, and the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to name a few. His litigation expertise in land use, appeals, business, and property rights law has led to legal victories and the setting of legal precedents throughout the state of California. Born in New York, and later spending parts of his childhood in both the California Central Valley and Los Angeles, Mr. Kassouni has a history of interaction with clients from all walks of life, from small farmers to large commercial developers. Further, one could say Mr. Kassouni’s legal career began on the school playground, where he often defended classmates from bullies. An instinct that survives to this day. Mr. Kassouni worked as an attorney for some of California’s most prestigious legal organizations before founding his own law firm in 2009 including the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office, the Pacific Legal Foundation, and the Zumbrun Law Firm (Ronald A. Zumbrun). While at the Zumbrun Law Firm, Mr. Kassouni served as both senior attorney and legal director to the firm. His legal experience includes complex land use, Constitutional property rights, appeals, business, real estate, and construction litigation in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Orange and Sacramento Counties. Mr. Kassouni also completed a judicial externship for Justice David N. Eagleson of the California Supreme Court in 1988. Education Mr. Kassouni is a Loyola Law School graduate with an undergraduate degree from the University of California at Berkeley.

Practice Areas
  • Appeals & Appellate
  • Business Law
  • Construction Law
  • Intellectual Property
  • Real Estate Law
Additional Practice Area
  • Constitutional Law
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Kassouni Law represents clients throughout the state of California. With a headquarters in Sacramento & satellite office in Los Angeles, the attorneys offer the same expertise with hourly rates much more affordable than attorneys who practice with headquarters in the larger metropolitan areas.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Federal District Court, Central District of California
Federal District Court, Eastern District of California
Federal District Court, Northern District of California
Federal District Court, Southern District of California
Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals
U.S. Supreme Court
United States Court of Claims
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Lead Attorney, Owner
Kassouni Law
- Current
Tim Kassouni acts as leading litigator for complex appeals, land use, and business law cases. Precedents set by Kassouni Law have changed public policy to protect Californians' Constitutional liberties.
Legal Director
Zumbrun Law Firm
-
The Zumbrun Law Firm is recognized as a leading Constitutional Property Rights and Public Policy Law Firm. As Legal Director for the organization, Tim Kassouni was the leading litigator on many cases.
Deputy District Attorney
Sacramento County District Attorney's Office
-
Attorney Clerk
Pacific Legal Foundation
-
Judicial Externship
California Supreme Court
-
Judicial externship for Justice David N. Eagleson
Education
Loyola Law School, Los Angeles
J.D.
University of California - Berkeley
B.A.
Professional Associations
Sacramento County Bar Association
Member
- Current
Activities: Environmental Section, Real Estate Section
California State Bar # 142907
Member
- Current
Federalist Society
President of Loyola Law School Federalist Society
-
Publications
Articles & Publications
The Unrepentant Sins of the California Coastal Commission - Timothy Kassouni & Ronald Zumbrun
The Daily Recorder
The Cost of Wetlands in Half Moon Bay - Timothy Kassouni & Ronald Zumbrun
The Daily Recorder
Protecting Private Property - Timothy Kassouni & Ronald Zumbrun
San Francisco Daily Journal
Combating Takings - Timothy Kassouni & Ronald Zumbrun
San Francisco Daily Journal
Conservation Easements - Timothy Kassouni & Ronald Zumbrun
The San Francisco Daily Journal
"The Ripeness Doctrine and the Judicial Relegation of Constitutionally Protected Property Rights" - Timothy V. Kassouni
California Western Law Review - Vol. 29 No. 1
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Website
Sacramento Land Use Lawyer
Blog
Appeal Lawyer & Land Use Lawyer Legal News
Legal Answers
17 Questions Answered

Q. How does the U.S. Constitution or a state constitution differ from other sources of law?
A: I assume what you are asking is what is the difference between a constitution and statutory law. If so, the answer is rather straightforward. A constitution is a grant of authority from the people to its government. A constitution lays out the structure, powers, and limits on government. For example, the US Constitution creates three branches of government --Congress, the President and the Courts. Article 1 section 8 of the Constitution says what Congress can write laws about, and the Bill of Rights places explicit limits on government action. By contrast, statutes are rules or regulations passed pursuant to constitutional authority. For example, the US Constitution gives Congress authority to create a post office. Congress may thus pass a statute that creates a post office in Chicago and a law that determines how much will be spent on the post office etc. If a statute is contrary to the Constitution it is void. You might also be interested in the following article which outlines the differences between the California Constitution and The United States Constituion http://www.kassounilaw.com/constitutional-law/constitutional-law-governm...
Q. Is it legal to with hold an american from flying the American flag?
A: The answer will depend entirely on the terms of your lease. The First Amendment prevents the government from restricting your expression, but it does not prevent private individuals from doing so. If you are leasing your property, the land lord/ property owner has the right to put certain aesthetic restrictions in the lease. In other words, the property owner has the right to determine to some degree what you do to the appearance of his property. For example, the lease may require that you not paint the house certain colors or plant certain trees. The lease may also forbid the flying of flags. It may seem silly or unpatriotic, but one of the great things about America is the freedom to decide what goes on one's property. For more about Constitutional property rights visit www.kassounilaw.com
Q. Is religious preaching on a community college campus legal
A: As a general matter, the First Amendment Protects the right to proselytize in public places (i.e. public parks, sidewalks etc.). However, courts have upheld "reasonable time place and manner" restrictions on the right to speak, so long as the restriction is not based on the content of the speech. For example, the government can prohibit random individuals from walking into a court-house and disrupting the trials there by yelling about unrelated matters. However, the government could not pass a law which only prohibited yelling in courthouses about something specific (e.g. taxes, wal-mart, or Jesus.). In other words, a blanket ban on yelling in courthouses is ok, a ban only on yelling about Jesus in courthouses is not. Likewise, a community college may prohibit non-students from using its facilities for any purpose (including preaching) and that prohibition will not violate the First Amendment. It could not, however, allow non-students on campus to discuss politics or morality, but prohibit non-students on campus from discussing religion. Accordingly, whether or not the community college can prevent you from preaching on campus will depend largely on what the school's policy toward non-students on campus is generally. This information provided by Sacramento Land Use Lawyers is for general guidance on matters of interest only. As such, it should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional Sacramento Lawyers.
Q. My shared block wall s leaning onto my property. What rights do I have to rebuild. This is a safety hazard.
A: I would contact your neighbor and request that each of you pay half the cost of repair or replacement. If a neighbor refuses and it is a health and safety risk, you should have the fence replaced at your own cost and then seek contribution from your neighbor in court.
Q. Does the lemon law include houses?
A: If you are having problems with the quality of construction of your home, you can seek remedies against the developer. You will need to consult with a construction-defect attorney. Additionally, I would add that you should take action as soon as possible as there are statutes of limitations that limit the amount of time you can bring action against the developer. There is nothing comparable to lemon laws in the state of California which typically apply to the purchase of new vehicles. For more information on construction defect law and examples of such, consider reading my webpage on construction defect law. http://www.kassounilaw.com/construction-law/
Q. What can we do when the neighbor intends to create property encroachment ?
A: I would suggest seeking a temporary restraining order if there is a threat of immediate harm. However, it would be a good idea to first contact the neighbor to try the resolve the matter without court proceedings. Consider consulting with a local land use attorney to review your options. http://www.kassounilaw.com/land-use-law/development-law/
Q. Does the 8th Amendment apply to the appeals process?
A: If you are asking if the appeals process is cruel and unusual punishment, the answere is it can often be a prolonged arduous process. However, if you are the appellee and receive a monetary judgement, remember that interest will continue to accrue on that award during the appeal process. If you wish, check out my webpage outlining the stages of the appeal process. http://www.kassounilaw.com/appeals/stages-of-an-appeal/
Q. What does vacated and remanded mean
A: It means a reviewing court, usually a court of appeal, has determined that a trial court judgement should be vacated, or in other words, eliminated. Remand means the case will now go back to the trial court for further proceedings consistant with the reviewing court decision. For more on the appeals process, see http://www.kassounilaw.com/appeals/stages-of-an-appeal/
Q. I was convicted back in 97 and i am trying to finds copies of my appeal where would i go??
A: Your appeal attorney may still have your file at his/her office. Consider contacting the attorney for it. Depending on the nature of the case, they may still have it. If not, contact the court where your appeal was heard.
Click here to see all answers
Social Media
Contact & Map
Sacramento Office
621 Capitol Mall
Suite 2025
Sacramento, CA 95814
USA
Toll-Free: (877) 770-7379
Telephone: (916) 930-0030
Los Angeles Office
2029 Century Park East
Suite 400N
Los Angeles, CA 90067
USA
Toll-Free: (877) 770-7379
Telephone: (424) 202-6927