Nasir Khan Esq.

Nasir Khan Esq.

The Khan Law Firm, Inc.
  • Immigration Law, Business Law, International Law...
  • California
Rate This Lawyer
Badges
Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&ASocial Media
Summary

Attorney Nasir "Nas" Khan is the founder and Lead Attorney for the Khan Law Firm, Inc. Half Hispanic and half Middle Eastern, Attorney Khan was raised all over the United States as the son of a United States Air Force officer, an upbringing which has played an influential role in his decision to practice business, international, and immigration law. Education: After receiving a bachelor's degrees in Political Science and Classical Civilizations from UC Berkeley, Attorney Khan went on to earn a law degree from American University's Washington College of Law, where his legal studies focused on International Law, Human Rights, and Immigration. Languages Spoken: Attorney Khan is fluent in Spanish, and is conversant in Italian. A lover of languages, Attorney Khan is also ever improving his Arabic and Hebrew language skills. Areas of Legal Interest: Attorney Khan especially enjoys representing International clients, whether they need help with obtaining asylum, need defense from deportation, or wish to sue a foreign company or government. Personal Interests: In addition to owning a thriving law practice, Attorney Khan loves to travel and has visited Spain, France, Italy, Mexico, Japan, England, Scotland, the Netherlands, and Dubai. He also enjoys playing rugby, and is also the author of an upcoming cookbook on traditional Afghan cuisine. Attorney Khan is licensed to practice law in the State of California.

Practice Areas
  • Immigration Law
  • Business Law
  • International Law
  • Probate
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
    We accept all major credit cards (Visa, Mastercard, American Express, Discover).
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
California
Languages
  • Italian: Spoken, Written
  • Spanish: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Founder and Lead Attorney
The Khan Law Firm, Inc.
- Current
Education
American University Washington College of Law
J.D. (2010) | International Law, Human Rights Law
-
Activities: Member of the Latino Law Students Association (LaLSA)
University of California - Berkeley
B.S. (2006) | Classical Civilizations and Political Science
-
Honors: Cal Alumni Scholar Award Recipient, Member of The Californians
Activities: Member of the Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity Member of the UC Men's Octet
Awards
Wiley W. Manuel Certificate For Pro- Bono Legal Services
California State Bar
Top 10 In California for Client Satisfaction
American Institute of Legal Counsel
Websites & Blogs
Website
https://www.khanattorneys.com
Legal Answers
9 Questions Answered

Q. married with a US citizen. What can i do to fix my status?
A: Hello there, Boy, it sounds like you've been put through the ringer. The first thing I would recommend would be to order your immigration court and arrest records to see if any irregularities might allow you to re-fight your case. Beyond that, you might be able to take advantage of some immigrant visas and waivers, but your multiple reentries and deportations do pose a serious problem. You definitely need an attorney, so consider consulting with one for a full analysis of your options.
Q. Can I work even if my permanent residence card is expired...
A: Hello there, If you're going for citizenship, I always recommend you have a valid, renewed green card before doing so- that way, there's no problems regarding your green card's validity at the interview. If you've had your green card for 5 years though, and you're crime free, you are qualified for citizenship- it's just a question of getting all your evidence in order. Consider consulting with an experienced immigration attorney on how to move forward. To answer your other question though, yes, you may still continue to work, provided your green card was intended to be permanent and not some temporary form. I hope that helps!
Q. We are getting a divorce. How Can I get a greencard.
A: Hello there, I'm terribly sorry to hear about your divorce. Your case sounds much like one I had last year, where the spouse was promised a green card, but one was never filed as a means of control. If that happens to be the case in your marriage, then you might qualify for various forms of relief. To discuss the full extent of what those might be, consider consulting with an experienced immigration attorney so that you can tell your story in it's entirety, and the attorney can then recommend your best course of action going forward.
Q. how do i write an explanation that establishes my failure to persue my immigrant visa application?
A: Hello there, What do you mean you failed? Were you supposed to pursue one? This typically happens with K-1 fiancee visa holders who do not file in time. If that's the case, you'll want to fully explain your situation, whatever that happens to be. The evidence may change depending on your circumstances, so I would encourage you to consult with an attorney to decide the best course of action, and what evidence you'll need to succeed.
Q. My boyfriend intended to came into United States illegal and got detained. What can I do?
A: Hello Texas, Did he just cross in the most recent wave, or has he been here for a while? Depending on when and how he crossed, and the circumstances which led him to do so, he may be eligible to remain in the US. Consider consulting with an experienced immigration attorney for a more complete analysis of his current options. It may be possible that he has a case, and that he's eligible to be bonded out and fight it from outside of detention.
Q. I'm a permanent resident here in the US. How can i bring my girlfriend and children over here in the US?
A: Hello Nevada, Largely, you'll want to file immigration petitions for them (I-130s). They'll likely process through US consulates in their home country, but to ensure proper filing and processing, consider consulting with an experienced immigration attorney first before taking further action.
Q. I am Syrian and applied for asylum I am on notice of hearing in removal proceedings can i travel for my business?
A: It depends on your current status. You might be able to get a travel permit (domestic? International?), but it would depend on where, for how long, and for what purpose. You don't present enough facts here to say yes or no, so consider contacting an experienced immigration attorney for a more complete consultation.
Q. i have a green card since 2005 and it will get expire in 11 months i want to know what should i do to renew?plz help me
A: Hi there, If your green card is expiring, you can file form I-90 to renew it. That said, you should only do so if 1) you don't have any other issues (like criminal convictions, etc.) which might prevent you from successfully doing so, or 2) you're not within the right time-frame for doing so. To make sure that now is the best time to file and to avoid any complications with the process, consider contacting an experienced immigration attorney for a consultation.
Q. Is there a better visa option for US entry besides the B2 visa? Rejected twice
A: Hi there, Given the facts provided, here's the best answer I can give right now. 1) The chances of being denied are pretty good, given that the US already doesn't believe he wants to return home. 2) Special events in Ireland help to prove he has something to return to. Special events in the US help prove he has something limited in the future to attend, boosting the case for a visit. 3) He should state he is staying only for the duration of whatever event he wants to visit for. 4) There may be many other visas which will work, but any attorney would need to ask you tons of questions before determining which would be best. 5) Traveling to Asia does not hurt his chances, but its largely country specific. If he traveled to Afghanistan, say, that might raise a couple flags. Singapore, not so much. You mentioned he was your "partner". Does that mean you are married? If so, having disclosed that fact might be the reason he's being rejected. Ireland is a visa waiver country though, so if he wants to come to the US for about 90 days without getting a visa, he can do so right at the airport. For a more detailed answer, I'd suggest contacting an experienced immigration attorney.
Click here to see all answers
Social Media
Contact & Map
The Khan Law Firm, Inc.
29970 Technology Drive, Suite 221
Murrieta, CA 92563
USA
Telephone: (951) 290-3737
Fax: (951) 224-6888