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Marc Andrew Moses

Marc Andrew Moses

Serving Clients in Kitsap and Pierce Counties
  • Family Law, Divorce, Domestic Violence...
  • California, Washington
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Summary

Attorney Moses has been defending juvenile and Family Law Clients in the courtroom since 1999. Whether your case is a divorce, legal separation, child custody and support, spousal support, domestic violence, or guardianship, he has the experience and resources necessary to achieve a successful outcome of your case. He has a strong background in defending the rights of individuals, and is competent to handle your case from beginning to end, with thoughtful attention to detail, whether it be at the negotiating table or in the courtroom.

Practice Areas
  • Family Law
  • Divorce
  • Domestic Violence
  • Estate Planning
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    If you are looking for an attorney, please feel free to telephone and discuss your case at no charge. You may also click the Email button on this page, or use the Contact Us button on the marcmoseslaw.com website.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
California
Washington
9th Circuit
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Law Office of Marc Andrew Moses
- Current
Education
Univ of Colorado Boulder
Undergraduate Degree
University of New Hampshire School of Law
J.D. (2000) | Family Law; Criminal Law; Estate Planning
-
Professional Associations
Kitsap County Bar Association
Member
Current
Pierce County Bar Association
Member
Current
Washington State Bar # 49554
Member
- Current
California State Bar # 217009
Member
- Current
Websites & Blogs
Website
Legal Answers
5 Questions Answered

Q. My wife has a daughter that isn't mine that I have raised for the past 15 years. Will I have to pay child support?
A: The short answer is no, but it depends on a few other factors. Children from other relationships are not considered for child support. The "depends" part is if the mother believes you are the father, which can be overcome with a DNA test, which would then result in you not paying child support. Basically, the law states : RCW 26.16.205 Liability for family support—Support obligation of stepparent (which you are presumably Not, being unmarried). ....When a petition for dissolution of marriage or state registered domestic partnership or a petition for legal separation is filed, the court may, upon motion of the stepparent, terminate the obligation to support the stepchildren. The obligation to support stepchildren shall cease upon the entry of a decree of dissolution, decree of legal separation, or death. This law speaks to stepparents and stepchildren, which I understand is not your case, since you're not married to the child's mother. But even if you were married, you would not be responsible. In my practice, we have many cases of divorce and paternity (unmarried couples with a child), where there is a half-sibling. In my experience, that child of the other parent is not considered for a source of child support. The court would look to the biological father of that child. Of course, your case is specific, and this information should be regarded as general information, and not legal advice specific to your situation. My office is always available to review your case individually.
Q. I’m a father living in Washington State and I pay child support in NY. I need a lawyer should I look for one here or NY?
A: Short answer: It depends. You wrote that you needed a lawyer, but didn't give the reason. It depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If you're looking to modify the amount of support or other order, and if the children have been living in New York for at least the last six months, you will need an attorney licensed to practice in New York to handle the case there, because New York has jurisdiction over the children. There may be exceptions: If the children have been living in Washington State for at least the past six months, you may transfer the case here. Another reason a case may be filed in Washington may be in the case of an emergency, such as domestic violence or if the child is otherwise in danger. There are other factors to consider whether you must use a New York attorney for your case in New York, or if you can use a Washington attorney to bring your case here. As you can see, the answer depends on your specific situation. I recommend that you consult with a family law attorney to discuss the details of your particular issues, since every situation is different.
Q. My child’s father recently moved to California, me and the child live in Washington, we don’t have a parenting plan...
A: I wouldn't wait to see if you are going to get in trouble for not allowing your child to talk to the other parent. There may be reasons to do so, but I would rather see you present the issue to the court and get a judge to issue an order. If the child resides in Washington, you can file a petition in Superior Court in the county where the child lives, then ask for a parenting plan and a child support order, the two issues mentioned in your question, as well as other issues that may affect you and your child. I would recommend that you consult with a family law attorney to discuss the details of your particular issues, since every situation is different.
Q. Does the non custodial parent stop paying child support during visitations, ie... summer breaks?
A: When a Washington court orders child support, the order states when it is payable- monthly, or bi-monthly, or perhaps within some other time frame. Unless the order states that payment of child support may be suspended when the non-custodial parent has parenting time (which is highly unlikely), child support is due all year long. Generally, child support and visitation are two separate issues. Visitation cannot be withheld because of non-payment of child support; likewise, child support cannot be withheld because visitation is not taking place, for whatever reason. I would, however, recommend that you consult with a family law attorney to discuss the details of your particular issues, since every situation is different.
Q. What to do if my spouse does not want to sign divorse papers?
A: When you say that your spouse will not sign divorce papers, I will assume that you have filed for dissolution, then tried to work out a settlement that you think is fair but he/she doesn't, so she won't "join" in the petition, which is what WA state calls it when the spouse agrees with the terms of the divorce you are asking for. Without your spouse's agreement, unfortunately you have to take further steps. Have you had a settlement conference? With a filed dissolution case, you can ask the clerk to schedule a settlement conference, which your spouse (and you) would need to attend. If at the settlement conference you are unsuccessful in resolving the issues, a trial date will be set. Having a trial date set has a way of lighting a fire under the parties. All of these things may have a hand in arriving at a "settlement on the courthouse steps," which is what I believe you are trying to achieve. I would, however, recommend that you consult with a family law attorney to discuss the details of your particular issues, since every situation is different.
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Contact & Map
Pierce County
5790 SOUNDVIEW DRIVE
STE 201-D
GIG HARBOR, WA 98335
USA
Telephone: (206) 456-4456
Kitsap County
19240 Jensen Way
#1331
Poulsbo, WA 98370
USA
Telephone: (206) 456-4456