Greg Freeze

Greg Freeze

Attorney in Port Townsend, Washington
  • Estate Planning, Probate, Elder Law...
  • California, Oregon, Washington
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Summary

Greg Freeze is an attorney in Port Townsend, Washington (www.RhodyLaw.com), who leverages his public company officer experience with being a lawyer on the Olympic Peninsula. With the great number of retirees in Port Townsend, his law practice includes a focus on wills, trusts, and estate plannning. But, as a general practitioner in Jefferson County, Washington, his motto is, "small town law -- all issues welcome."

Practice Areas
  • Estate Planning
  • Probate
  • Elder Law
  • Real Estate Law
  • DUI & DWI
  • Personal Injury
  • Business Law
  • Family Law
  • Divorce
  • Landlord Tenant
  • Foreclosure Defense
Additional Practice Areas
  • General Civil
  • Wills & Trusts
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
California
Oregon
Washington
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Attorney
Greg Freeze, Attorney at Law
- Current
Oregon Coast Attorney specializing in the practice of law in Florence, Oregon. As an attorney in Florence, Oregon, a wide variety client issues can be found including: wills and trusts, estate planning, real estate law, divorce, family law, business law, employment law, elder law, taxation, product liability, personal injury, DUII, Social Security and disability law, and criminal law. I operate with the motto: "small town law, all issues welcome."
Consultant
Greg Freeze, Consultant
- Current
As a consultant, I help companies bring their software product visions to market, leveraging several decades of software development experience into concrete go-to-market strategies.
Vice President of Operations
Blue Lava Group
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Assisted CEO in finding $2M in venture capital funding while running the operational aspects of this extreme-niche, internet retailer.
Chief Operating Officer
CAM Commerce Solutions
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Managed day-to-day operations of this NASDAQ company by providing software and hardware point-of-sale systems to over 15,000 small retailers.
Project Manager
Epicor Software Corp.
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Led enterprise resource planning (ERP) software development projects.
Vice President
Legal Management Systems, Inc.
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Automated mid-sized law firms with back-office software technology after authoring LegalWare, a package that handled timekeeping and billing, accounts payable, accounts receivable, general ledger, conflict of interest, file room management, and trust accounting.
Various
Ultimate Southern California, Inc.
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Responsibilities at this $200M NYSE company expanded based on the progression through the following positions with the company: Programmer/Analyst, Senior Programmer Analyst, Classroom Training Manager, Telemarketing Manager, Account Executive, and Marketing Manager.
Education
Whittier Law School
J.D. | Intellectual Property
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California State University - Fullerton
MBA | International Business
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California State University - Fullerton
B.A. (1984) | Business Administration
Concentration in Marketing, Finance and Management Information Systems.
Professional Associations
Oregon Coast Military Heritage Museum
Board Member
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Fountain Valley Chamber of Commerce
Chairman of the Board, President
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Fountain Valley Chamber of Commerce
President
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Activities: Provided leadership for the office staff and board of directors; ran monthly luncheons; presided over board meetings; led evening events; set direction for the chamber; participated in community events.
Certifications
Certificate in Intellectual Property
CPIM (Certified in Production and Inventory Management)
American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS)
MCSE, MCDBA
Microsoft
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Legal Answers
28 Questions Answered

Q. does revocable trust need to be witness in California
A: A trust does not need to be witnessed to be official. The witness requirement applies to wills and healthcare powers. A quitclaim deed is fine. There is nothing easier. More problematic is the Preliminary Change in Ownership Report (PCOR). This document is required to file the deed in the county where the property resides. The PCOR, when filled out correctly, alerts the property tax folks that there is not a taxable event. Disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change.
Q. Dad passed living out of state. Assets in OH, I'm the only child & live out of state, what do I do? Will not found.
A: The probate is best started in the county in Ohio where your father resided. The Ohio courts will have "jurisdiction" over the house. If the original will cannot be found, courts presume that the will was destroyed intentionally by the testator. You can proceed with an probate using intestate succession. If your father was not married at the time of his passing, most states have rules that state that the next to receive are the children. But, get an Ohio attorney to get everything moving for you. Your question got posted in Washington. The dual licensed attorney for Washington and Ohio is quite rare. So mostly, you are going to get an answer that says, "contact an Ohio attorney." Disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change.
Q. I am living in our RV which is registered in wife's name. do I have legal right to keep as my residence?
A: Oregon is an equitable division state, which means that a judge can order whatever is fair under the circumstances of the marital relationship. Generally speaking, it's best to think of everything starting at a 50/50 point of view, before the marital assets are split. People often only get a judge involved after the asset division is solve together, either through mediation, mutual agreement, or attorney negotiations. When the issues of a dissolution are solved in advance, the court generally accepts the paperwork, in the form of a Stipulated Judgment of Dissolution of Marriage. But as a simple example of an equitable division, if the RV is worth $10,000, then your wife is going to get $10,000 in the form of some other asset attributable to the marriage. That's the general starting point of fair. Of course, you'll find attorneys that want to fight. But do realize that judges are reasonable people. It's hard to pull over a non-50/50 argument with a judge, unless you really have some facts that support a disproportionate division. Disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change.
Q. Is it a scam if you are contacted by either police or lawyer and are told to pay back something or you go to jail?
A: Scam, scam, scam. This particular one takes many forms, but rest assured, if you have really done something wrong the police will be talking to you in person. A variation on this theme of scam involves the IRS. The IRS won't call--there is always a letter. Disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change.
Q. Do you go to court to challenge a search warrant (call witnesses, etc) or submit the challenge in writing?
A: Challenging a search warrant begins with a motion to suppress. The classic case that is nearing 30,000 citations from other cases in the country is Franks v. Delaware. Here is quote from that case. "... where the defendant makes a substantial preliminary showing that a false statement knowingly and intentionally, or with reckless disregard for the truth, was included by the affiant in the warrant affidavit, and if the allegedly false statement is necessary to the finding of probable cause, the Fourth Amendment requires that a hearing be held at the defendant's request." Franks v. Delaware, 438 US 154, 155–56, 98 S Ct 2674, 2676, 57 L Ed 2d 667 (1978). To get to a so-called Franks hearing, you must present a motion to the court supported by one or more affidavits that state with specificity what went wrong exactly in the warrant affidavit. That means, not any generalities, but specific incidents of the bad stuff used by the police to get a judge or magistrate to sign off on the warrant. If the motion and affidavit make a strong enough case as to wrong doing, and the judge thinks that, if your contention is correct, then maybe the warrant wouldn't have been issued (i.e., it was "necessary to the finding of probably cause") and then you get to have a Franks hearing. If you win the argument at the Franks hearing (i.e., pretrial, no jury yet), then the court will suppress certain things that may go beyond even what was discovered in the search (i.e., fruits of the search). Your odds are not strong in putting together a winning case of this sort without considerable legal training and experience. This whole line of argument also plays better from a third-party (i.e., your attorney). This is because, well, the judge and the attorneys on both sides know what evidence there is. Basically the defense attorney is arguing for a technical foul, where, in some cases, much of the good evidence for the prosecution is excluded from ever reaching a jury. If the defendant is lucky, the prosecutions case might not have enough stuff to go forward to trial. Get a local attorney to go over your specific facts. This type of motion is heavily fact specific. Disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change.
Q. What are the consequences for telling a judge that a DV report they called in didn’t really happen?
A: Let's start with, this isn't the judge's first rodeo. Credibility of the recantation will be at issue. Next, you're question needs to be put in the context of where you are with regard to trial and sentencing. If you are pretrial, the goal would seem to be to cause the prosecution to withdraw the case. I've seen cases go forward with the police officer's testimony as to what the victim reported, using an exception to the hearsay rule. The criminal case is from "we the people" versus the defendant. That's why it goes forward. There may be other witnesses. Yet, I've also see cases merely threaten to go forward, probably with the hopes of getting a plea on a property crime rather than a person crime. But, if you're pretrial, there is a lot of posturing. But, it is a rare recantation that is believed by the prosecution. It's just not believed. It's understood, but not believed. But, that's how prosecutors are wired. If you have been sentence and are seeking a new trial on a motion, then this quote is relevant. "If the recantation is not credible, then it is not material, and an essential factor that would support a new trial is missing." State v. Ieng, 87 Wn. App. 873, 875, 942 P.2d 1091, 1092 (1997). On a DV4, it's unlikely that a defendant would even consider an attempt at a second bite at the apple. If you are the victim, and you are going to recant and minimize, your better question is whether the judge will hold you in contempt or bring charges against you the victim. I would find this unlikely. Generally, judges are careful to call a victim-witness "not credible" rather than lying. The judge is well aware of battered woman's syndrome or its analog for men. Part of the syndrome involves denial, forgiveness, codependency, and a whole host of other things that could be brought into the trial using an expert witness. I find the expert witness unlikely to be used in a DV4. Bringing in an expert witness is expensive, so one finds this weapon associated with the high-stakes felony cases. But as victim, the fear of getting charged with making a false report, or some other such crime, typically causes the victim to "minimize" along with recanting partially with regards to certain most-damning statements. Paradoxically, or logically, this fear of reprisal by the judge has a side effect--the judge sees through the recanting and minimizing. Disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change.
Q. If I want to sell a massager online and the name I want to trademark for it is already registered for a spa service,
A: Yes, a trademark would be denied if it is used in the same industry segment. How wide one defines segment is a bit of an art itself, but the trademarked phrase (that's a pun) is "likelihood of confusion." To me, massage and spa are just too close. If the trademark of the "competitor" is registered, the penalty threat for infringement comes from the Lanham Act, where it wields treble (triple) damages. Disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change.
Q. I am a lawyer in Pakistan and i wanted to know that, can anyone sue a parent as well as subsidiary company at the same
A: Yes. Depending on the jurisdiction, you'll want the Complaint to have the right kind of details. Some jurisdictions use fact-based pleadings while others use notice-based pleadings. You'll want to bone up on "piercing the corporate veil" in order to be successful. Disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change.
Q. Policy holdivorcedd in Hawaii, resided in CA. Changed his beneficiary of Life Ins. We have counter claims
A: The question is a bit fragmented. My reorganization of the facts may be wrong, but I will try. Husband ("H") and Wife ("W") got a divorce in Hawaii. H moved to California. H changed the beneficiaries on his life insurance policy. Then H died. W survived and believes she has a right to the life insurance policy. The missing document is the divorce decree or divorce judgment or whatever it might be called. If H was paying W spousal support, it's possible for a court to order the spousal support (alimony) to be covered by life insurance. One won't know without looking at the court papers. For that, you order the court papers from the county court. Then you look. Now, life insurance carriers are a strong lobbying group. Banks are too. The effect of all that influence is that the laws associated with paying out beneficiaries are written in favor of the banks and life insurance companies. Basically, these companies don't have to care about some judgment sitting in a county courthouse basement in Maui County. If there is a beneficiary form on file for the life insurance, the company can pay out according to the beneficiary statement. No foul if this is wrong. California has seen attorneys that don't understand ERISA and the institution-favored laws, and the attorneys, representing people like Wife, sue the insurance companies and banks in order to try to uphold the judgment made in a state divorce case. They fail. Once that money is paid out to the beneficiaries, Wife's attorneys are barking up the wrong tree for the money. The right tree, if the divorce paperwork says that monies are to go to Wife, is to sue the Estate of H and the beneficiaries and attempt to claw back the money. The theory of that lawsuit is call Constructive Trust. Mind you, this is all because of the need of the financial institutions to have a low-risk world for paying out beneficiaries upon a minor investigation that basically is the certificate of death. I've been on both sides of this one. So far, the attorney on the other side has been clueless as to the rules. The rules make logical sense when you follow the money--by that I mean the billions. The rules are written so that the folks with the billions don't have legal problems with hidden state court divorce cases. Some of these things are hidden time bombs. There are divorces from the 1960s and 1970s where this pops up. You wonder what that lawsuit looks like? Well, H was order to do something, long ago, and H didn't do it. It is only upon discovery that W finds out that H changed the beneficiaries. Modernly, attorneys doing the dissolution of marriage judgments try to be clear about what rights the beneficiary spouse to a life insurance policy might have with respect to the life insurance companies. I have decent confidence that the major insurance carriers now have a workflow for registering the interest of W that cannot be destroyed by H without notifying W and getting W's permission in writing. These safeguards did not exist for the divorces from the distant past. But, I've gone perhaps too far down this path. Back to the beginning--does the divorce paperwork have anything that supports W's claim? Disclaimer: The response given is not intended to create, nor does it create an ongoing duty to respond to questions. The response does not form an attorney-client relationship, nor is it intended to be anything other than the educated opinion of the author. It should not be relied upon as legal advice. The response given is based upon the limited facts provided by the person asking the question. To the extent additional or different facts exist, the response might possibly change.
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914 Washington St, Ste 3
PO Box 1950
Port Townsend, WA 98368
USA
Telephone: (360) 344-8100