Christie Tournet

Christie Tournet

Wills, Estates, and Probate Attorney - Mandeville, LA
  • Estate Planning, Probate, Landlord Tenant...
  • Louisiana
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Summary

With extensive experience in real estate and business management, Christie Tournet & Associates is the consummate business, estate planning, and successions/probate firm. Christie views legal issues through a unique lens and becomes a trusted legal and business adviser.

Practice Areas
  • Estate Planning
  • Probate
  • Landlord Tenant
  • Real Estate Law
  • Workers' Compensation
  • Business Law
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Louisiana
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Principal Attorney
Christie Tournet & Associates, LLC
- Current
Associate
Galloway Johnson Tompkins Burr Smith, APLC
-
Estate planning, succession, real estate, construction and employment defense
Education
Loyola University New Orleans
J.D. (2010) | Civil Law
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Honors: Probate Highest Grade Award, LaNasa-Greco Scholarship
Loyola University New Orleans
B.B.A. (2003) | Economics, International Business, Spanish
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Honors: Summa Cum Laude
Awards
The Loyola Law Excellence Award in Probate
Loyola University New Orleans College of Law
Professional Associations
Louisiana State Bar Association
Member
- Current
22nd JDC Bar
Member
- Current
American Inns of Court
Member
- Current
North Shore Estate Planning Council
Member
- Current
Publications
Articles & Publications
Louisiana New Home Warranty Act & The LREC Disclosure Form
CRES Insurance
Speaking Engagements
Estate Planning, Northshore Kiwanis, mandeville, la
Northshore Kiwanis
https://issuu.com/northshorekiwanismandeville/docs/northshore_kiwanis_-_2012-13_award_
Estate Planning, Northshore Kiwanis, mandeville, la
Northshore Kiwanis
https://issuu.com/northshorekiwanismandeville/docs/northshore_kiwanis_-_2012-13_award_
Estate Planning, Northshore Kiwanis, mandeville, la
Northshore Kiwanis
Certifications
Louisiana Statewide Notary Public Commission
State of Louisiana
Websites & Blogs
Website
Legal Answers
91 Questions Answered

Q. If I have a will from another state do I need to make a new one after moving to Louisiana?
A: You don't have to, but you should - at some point. Louisiana law does recognize, and give effect to, Wills drafted outside of LA that comply with the state's laws for where the Will was drafted. However, once you move to Louisiana and become a Louisiana resident, you are subject to its community property and forced heirship laws. Thus, you want to make sure that the Will in place not only complies with those unique considerations, but that it adequately addresses all your current intentions. Also, probate in Louisiana usually occurs much more cost-effectively and timely than in other states, so arrangements that you made outside of Louisiana may not be the best options if you decide to permanently reside in LA.
Q. How soon does the probate process start after the person's death? Can we stall?
A: While there is no legal requirement to open succession within a certain timeframe, sooner is always better for coordinating heirs, accessing documents and obtaining information for the succession, and for reduced costs and timeline.
Q. Do the beneficiaries of a living trust have to pay estate taxes?
A: Depends. Generally, a living trust is established during one's lifetime and are revocable. Thus, transfers to the trust are not exempt from the person's estate the gave to the Trust. Once a Trust is established, it may have its own income tax liability. Whether Federal estate taxes are triggered is determine by what falls under the taxable estate and if it hits the threshold in effect at time of death.
Q. Can you sign your share of an estate over to another share holder (sibling) without a secession in LA?
A: No - not without a succession of some form being done. Specifically, as to real estate and other titled assets, the title will show in the Decedent's name and to have the heirs/beneficiaries show as the correct, new owners some form of succession must be done. Also, you cannot simply have someone renounce a succession with the intention of one share going to another heir. Renunciations have consequences - usually where the renouncing heirs share goes to his/her children. Still, while some form of succession will have to be done first, Louisiana successions can be very streamlined - either by Affidavit or pleading based. Once the succession transfers titles of the succession assets to the correct heirs - either by direction of the Will or default, intestacy (no Will) laws, then the sibling can donate/transfer his/her share to another sibling. This is frequently done with successions. You should contact counsel well versed in probate to discuss your specific circumstances and to obtain a more precise recommendation for proceeding.
Q. Is it possible to create a revocable living trust (in order to avoid probate) after the person dies?
A: No. Once someone passes, you cannot create any trust as to those estate or succession assets. Rather, you must do a succession and the estate must be transferred either by terms of a Will, or by default, LA law.
Q. In Livingston Parish, if I paid the property taxes on family owned land, can I claim that land and put in my name?
A: No. Under Louisiana law, property is conveyed only in 1 of 3 ways: by a deed (if someone is still alive), by succession (either by Will, or default state law for distribution of one's estate), or by adverse possession (owning as owner for a certain time period). If you are talking about "family land," most often people use that phrase when there are multiple owners, some of which cannot be found. Those situations make a succession or an adverse possession suit almost impossible, as you must advise the court as to who heirs or all the potential, other owners are and serve them with notice of the suit.
Q. What could happen to an executor of an intestate succession spends some the money he is entitled to before it settled.
A: Lots of variables here. Not sure why an estate is still open 3 years, when the value appears relatively modest. Successions - unless contested - should not have to reach a "discovery" stage. Also, if your brother passed without a Will, then his estate should go to his heirs, either his children, or next in line, the surviving spouse, if the property at issue is community. If your brother had separate property, that goes first to children and if no children, then siblings. All of these issues need to be addressed with new counsel well versed in probate.
Q. How can I sell my deceased moms car and home? She died in Louisiana in testate. 2 adult children one doesn't come around
A: If your mom passed without a Will, her estate is transferred to her, default legal heirs, her descendants/children. But, the transfer in title is not automatic - a succession must be done. Depending upon the value of the estate, an attorney may be able to do an Affidavit of Small Succession. Otherwise, judicial opening may be necessary. You should speak with counsel well versed in probate to obtain more precise recommendations for your specific circumstances.
Q. My parents want to leave my brother nothing in their will but they live in Louisiana. how do they accomplish this?
A: Under La law, a Testator can execute a Will leaving his/her estate to whomever/whatever it pleases - for example, a neighbor, friend, or charity. The only exception: you cannot completely disinherit a forced heir. The court will still uphold the Will and Testator's intentions, but if a forced heir exists, a "forced portion" will go to that heir. And, a forced heir is a child under the age of 24, or a child that has a disability that prevents him/her from taking care of his/her person or property. If your brother is not a forced heir, your parents can draft Wills leaving their estates to one another, to a separate child, etc.
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Contact & Map
1795 W. Causeway Approach
Suite 103A
Mandeville, LA 70471
USA
Telephone: (985) 951-2177