Cameron Lambe

Cameron Lambe

Brownlee Whitlow Praet & File, PLLC
  • Landlord Tenant, Real Estate Law, Business Law...
  • North Carolina
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Summary

Cameron Lambe is a civil litigation attorney with experience in contract negotiation and dispute, real estate law and litigation, and business and employment law.
She is also a North Carolina native with a background in small business ownership and marketing, specifically in the areas of real estate, property management, and the beauty industry.

Practice Areas
  • Landlord Tenant
  • Real Estate Law
  • Business Law
  • Collections
  • Insurance Defense
  • Foreclosure Defense
  • Gov & Administrative Law
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
North Carolina
Professional Experience
Attorney
Brownlee Whitlow Praet & File, PLLC
- Current
Attorney
Stuart Law Firm, PLLC
-
Extern
North Carolina Court of Appeals
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Education
University of North Carolina School of Law
Duke University
B.A. (2011)
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Professional Associations
North Carolina State Bar
Member
Current
North Carolina Bar Association
Communications Committee Member
Current
American Bar Association
Member Resources Team Member
Current
Wake County Bar Association
Swearing-In Committee Member
Current
Federal Bar Association
Member
Current
Raleigh Chamber of Commerce Young Professionals Network
Member
Current
Chapel Hill Public Library Foundation
Board Member
Current
Speaking Engagements
Marketing and Business Development in Salons, Chapel Hill, NC
Aveda Institute of Chapel Hill
Marketing and Business Development in Salons, Raleigh, NC
Wake Technical Community College
Websites & Blogs
Website
Brownlee Whitlow Praet & File
Legal Answers
30 Questions Answered

Q. I have an signed agreement to refund me $20,000 from a company but it is past due and they did not pay.
A: Although you could represent yourself, hiring an attorney with experience in contracts and collections would be helpful considering the amount of money at stake. An attorney will be able to assist you to help ensure that you obtain proper service, file the right action, and follow the proper execution procedures once you have the judgment.
Q. I am forming an LLC with a partner. The LLC name is each of our last names. How can I protect the name of the LLC?
A: While I'm not exactly sure what the second part of your question is asking, a trademark filed with the USPTO will protect the LLC name if it is distinctive and unique, and that will apply nation-wide. Many local businesses don't opt for this level of protection if they only plan to operate locally, as registering prevents another entity from using the same name, although it obviously does not prevent a sole-proprietor from using that name.
Q. Can a North Carolina HOA borrow money without the consent of affected homeowners/lot owners?
A: Many powers and restrictions of an HOA are outlined in the governing documents of the HOA. Please consult your articles and bylaws and/or an attorney to determine if these rights are spelled out in them.
Q. After having an offer accepted on a home it was determined that a deceased member of the seller has a heir who is a
A: I assume from your question that it has already been determined that the minor does have a valid interest in the property? If the deceased had a will, that is not always the case, which is why I am inquiring. If the heir does have an interest, the sellers will have to include the heir in the deed conveying the property. It would not normally be an extensive process (assuming the heir wants to sell), but because the heir is a minor, a guardian will need to be appointed for his/her interest in the property, and if they do not want to sell, this may protract the process as well. I cannot offer a time estimate, but there are multiple moving parts that will need to be dealt with.
Q. As a landlord, my tenant’s hot water tank broke and increased her bill. Am I responsible for her bill?
A: The short answer is that it will depend on your lease agreement. Many lease agreements contain provisions regarding maintenance and repairs that outline the responsibilities of each party. Often, these only require that the landlord be responsible for timely fixing written maintenance requests. If a tenant sues for the difference in the bill, it is difficult to say, even with the best lease, what a magistrate might award as damages. Regardless, please review the language of your lease agreement first, and, if still uncertain, please consult an attorney.
Q. I have a contract to sell a home but 3 days prior to closing there is a fire. Is this still a valid contract
A: The purchase agreement likely contains provisions concerning "acts of god" i.e., a fire, as well as requirements for modification or re-negotiation. Please consult your purchase agreement and/or an attorney to determine what rights and responsibilities both parties have in this instance.
Q. I share ownership of real estate with one person. Can I gift my part to them without their acceptance?
A: All of this will depend on how the property was conveyed to you, which will be evident from the language in your deed. It is possible that your interest may be unaffected by anything your brother does (or doesn't do), but it is impossible to say without knowing what type of interest you hold in the property. You are always able to deed over your interest in the property, but it may not be necessary. To fully understand your rights and possibilities, please consult an attorney.
Q. How do I legally sell a home where I am not on title?
A: If your spouse is the only one holding legal title, you may not have much of an option to sell the home. It is possible that you may have an interest in the home if your spouse purchased it while you were together, but an attorney would need to review the deed. There are different types of deeds which convey different interests in property, but it is unlikely that an educated seller (or lender) would be willing to purchase a property for anything less than a full warranty of ownership. I would strongly suggest consulting an attorney to help ascertain what interests you have, if any, in the home, potentially assist in tracking down your spouse to have him deed over the home to you, or even determine whether you are able to assert color of title due to your occupancy of the home. Good luck!
Q. If I let a friend move into my home,(i am not putting her name on anything) what do I need to do if it doesn't work out?
A: It will depend on whether or not she pays rent or any utilities. If she does, it may be construed as her actually having a lease, even if there is not one in writing. Leases are a tricky area of the law, and if you have any concerns, it would be best to consult an attorney about the specifics of your situation.
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Contact & Map
4020 Westchase Blvd
# 530
Raleigh, NC 27607
USA
Telephone: (919) 263-5296
Cell: (336) 413-2712