Mark Scoblionko

Mark Scoblionko

Scoblionko, Scoblionko, Muir & Melman
  • Business Law, Insurance Claims, Medical Malpractice...
  • Pennsylvania
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Summary

Native of the Lehigh Valley. Has been the President of Scoblionko, Scoblionko, Muir & Melman since 1975. Married to Deena since 1964; two children, three grandchildren. 2012 recipient of the Lifetime Service Award from Jewish Federation of the Lehigh Valley. Certified as "Civil Trial Advocate" by National Board of Trial Advocacy. Focuses on civil personal injury and commercial litigation, business and corporate law, real estate.

Practice Areas
  • Business Law
  • Insurance Claims
  • Medical Malpractice
  • Personal Injury
  • Products Liability
  • Health Care Law
  • Nursing Home Abuse & Neglect
  • Construction Law
Additional Practice Area
  • Automobile Accidents
Fees
  • Free Consultation
  • Credit Cards Accepted
    VISA, MasterCard
  • Contingent Fees
    (For personal injury matters)
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Pennsylvania
3rd Circuit
U.S. Supreme Court
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Scoblionko, Scoblionko, Muir & Melman
- Current
Education
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
J.D. / Law
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Honors: Graduated with Honors
Activities: Assistant Editor, University of Michigan Law Review; Research Assistant, Constitutional Law
Cornell University
B.A. / English
-
Awards
Lifetime Service Award
Jewish Federation of the Lehigh Valley
Awarded upon retirement from the Board of the Jewish Federation
Professional Associations
Pennsylvania State Bar
Member
Current
Lehigh County Bar Association
Member
Current
American Bar Association
Member
Current
Pennsylvania Association for Justice
Member
Current
American Association for Justice
Member
Current
Jewish Day School of the Lehigh Valley
Counsel
- Current
Activities: Provide pro bono services, including financing, contracts, general litigation.
Jewish Community Center of Allentown
Counsel
- Current
Activities: Provide pro bono legal services in a variety of areas, including financing and real estate.
Jewish Day School of Lehigh Valley Supporting foundation/Endowment
President
- Current
Activities: Provide endowment support for Jewish Day School of the Lehigh Valley
Jewish Federation of the Lehigh Valley
Board Member/Vice President
-
Activities: Served as Vice President, Campaign Chair, and Co-Chair of Strategic Planning; Performed merger of Federations in Lehigh and Northampton Counties
Publications
Articles & Publications
Notes
Michigan Law Review
Certifications
Civil Trial Advocate
National Board of Trial Advocacy
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Legal Answers
149 Questions Answered

Q. Will money I gift to my grandchildren be subject to gift tax?
A: A person is allowed to gift $14,000.00 per year to each and any individual, or number of individuals. If the gifting person is married, the gift can be joint, which doubles the permissible gift to $28,000.00 per year per individual. If a larger gift is desired, it would potentially be subject to gift tax. However, it is permissible to file a gift tax return, treat that as a reduction of future estate tax exemption, which is now over $5,000,000.00, and pay no gift tax. This is a generic explanation. There were insufficient facts contained in your question to give you a specific affirmative or negative answer to your question.
Q. My parents passed away in 2004, I am the executor to the will and the house was deeded to myself and 3 siblings.
A: Your question is unfortunately unclear. If the house still remains in the estate, you, as Executor, can act alone. If the estate was closed out and the property was actually deeded to you and your siblings, the fact that you were the Executor is irrelevant. If the house was deeded, the next question is whether you own the house with your siblings jointly, with rights of survivorship, or if you own the house as tenants in common. If you own the house as tenants in common, each sibling could file an ejectment (eviction) action for that sibling's share, which would effectively force the grandson out of the whole property. If you own the house jointly, all of the siblings must act together or not at all. The alternative would be for any sibling to bring an action to force a sale of the property. This could be done irrespective of whether the home is owned as tenants in common or joint tenants. You need to consult a lawyer to sort through this.
Q. PA resident in accident in MD caused by MD resident. What state would I file a diminished value suit?
A: You would have to file suit in Maryland, and Maryland substantive law would likely apply. Having said that, I must add that I have never heard the term, "diminished value" suit, in the context of an automobile accident and do not know what you are referencing.
Q. Am I able to add my name to my daughter's deed, who has recently passed away? Or do I have to go through Probate?
A: You have to go through probate.
Q. Mom died - Can I Quit Claim Deed my moms investment property that is need of MAJOR repairs?
A: Unfortunately, this is not a simple problem, and you will need to consult with a Pennsylvania lawyer to advise you. If you do absolutely nothing, and just leave the property, paying no taxes or utilities, in due course, it will be foreclosed on by any mortgage holder or by the city for delinquent taxes. If people are living in this property, they will obviously have to be given notice in advance so that they can vacate. To "get rid" of the property otherwise will require a deed of conveyance to someone, even if it is just given away. However, to give a deed requires that you first open an estate and be appointed as Administrator. Since you live out of state, you may be required to post a bond. Further, once you open an estate, there will be tax returns to file, legal and administrative fees, etc. You would be best advised to promptly consult a lawyer to help you sort this out and get things taken care of.
Q. Can we take title to an investment real estate in PA as Tenants by the Entirety? We're married and living in PA. Thanks.
A: I know of nothing that prevents an investment property from being held as tenants by the entireties. However, if there is such a restriction, you can certainly own the property as joint tenants with right of survivorship, which, as a practical matter, would be virtually identical. Having answered your specific question, however, I would note that the decision to take title this way should be reviewed with a lawyer, as there could well be reasons, such as liability concerns, that might cause you to want to do something differently, such as to form a limited liability company, which could be owned jointly, and have the limited liability company own the real estate.
Q. What steps do I need to take to get a false mechanics lien removed?
A: You need to promptly hire a lawyer and have him demand that the lien be removed. If it is not, the lawyer can then move to strike it and, if appropriate, thereafter sue the person for malicious abuse of process. If you are successful with that claim, you may be able to recover your costs and counsel fees, as well as other damages.
Q. If purchasing a home from an estate, to what person/entity does the check get made out?
A: You need a lawyer and title insurance company to advise you and quarterback the transaction. The way the check is made out is probably the least complicated of the potential issues.
Q. The deed on my parents' house reads "John Doe and Jane Doe, Husband & Wife." How to get new deed after death of one?
A: I assume that your father died. If so, based on what you said, a new deed is not necessary. Since the deed referenced their ownership as "husband and wife," it means that they owned it as "tenants by the entireties," as a matter of law. That confers automatic rights of survivorship to your mother. Thus, she already owns the property by survivorship and a new deed is not necessary.
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Contact & Map
40 S 5th St
Allentown, PA 18101
USA