Terrence H Thorgaard

Terrence H Thorgaard

  • Bankruptcy, Business Law, Estate Planning...
  • Alaska, Florida
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Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&A
Summary

I was born and raised in Fairbanks, Alaska, where I practiced law from 1977. I was a municipal attorney for the first part of my legal career, and then switched to private practice. I conducted a general private law practice, with emphasis in civil litigation and bankruptcy. I also taught several college-level courses relating to various aspects of the law. In 2004, my family and I moved to Florida and have been here ever since. From 2011 to 2015 I worked for another lawyer in Walton County, assisting him in his office, especially with scheduling of attendance at real estate foreclosure hearings in behalf of secured creditors. I was admitted to the Florida bar in 2016.

Practice Areas
  • Bankruptcy
  • Business Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Municipal Law
  • Criminal Law
  • Probate
  • Tax Law
Additional Practice Areas
  • General Civil
  • Aviation Law
Fees
  • Free Consultation
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Alaska
Florida
9th Circuit
U.S. Court of Claims
U.S. District (& Bankruptcy) Court - Northern District of Florida
U.S. District (& Bankruptcy) Court, District of Alaska
U.S. Tax Court
Education
University of Alaska - Fairbanks
B.A. / History (1973)
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University of Puget Sound
J.D.
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Legal Answers
1015 Questions Answered

Q. Can my son's father ban me from taking him out of the country? How do I know if he did?
A: Your son will need a passport with which to leave the country. In general, the application will require the written consent of both parents.
Q. If I receive a letter with a flash claim. What should I do?
A: First, you should consider why it is your interest to respond at all to this letter. Is this a demand letter from an attorney in behalf of the allegedly injured person? If you like, scan and send me via e-mail the letter, along with what you believe is incorrect about it, and I will discuss it with you in more detail.
Q. (FOR A BOOK PROJECT) what is the maximum sentence this person can serve?
A: First, you need to determine what crime or crimes Erik may have committed. This may depend upon some facts which you have not stated. For example, was Erik aware that Arther had a blackjack? Did he have cause to believe that, when told to " Hit 'em", Arther would use a blackjack? Once you know the statutory elements of the crime(s) you are considering, you need to consider how all of the facts may apply so as to lead to a conviction. It is conceivable that this is a capital crime, but you won't know until after you conduct the analysis I have described.
Q. I am being evicted by my apartment complex. I filed a response yet was still put in default. Can I stop it?
A: I'm not sure how you could have been defaulted if you had filed an answer. If you will send me (via email) the online docket, I can look at it and see if I can figure out what happened.
Q. Can I move out at 18 in Florida legally?
A: Yes, unless you have been adjudged to be incapacitated.
Q. Lease began on April 15. 2 weeks later the property manager asks me to sign addendums requiring use of area rugs.
A: The specification that "no other agreements exist" refers to agreements prior to the date of the lease. Parties are always free to agree to change agreements. That is what you did by signing the addendums. I would have suggested that you refuse to sign the addendums, but it appears to be too late for that.
Q. I paid for a trip with my ex. she gave me some money towards it. she isn't going now, her choice.
A: It sure doesn't look like it, but as they say "the devil is in the details". Is any of this in writing (including email correspondence and text messaging)? Was she informed that the trip was non-refundable?
Q. Okay to compel drug-testing / criminal background check due to new customer contract requirements?
A: In general, yes it is ok to require your employees to undergo such testing, and you don't have to reassign the employees who refuse to do so. Contact your house counsel for any exceptions which may apply depending on your company's specific circumstances.
Q. I live in Florida. Why is the claim being decided by an adjudicator in Kentucky
A: Because it is Social Security administrative law. My guess is the Social Security Administration doesn't have venue rules requiring that a matter be adjudicated in the state in which the applicant resides. I suggest that you contact the SSA and ask whether and how it can be transferred to somewhere closer. Alternatively, you can ask that any required hearings be telephonic.
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Contact & Map
51 Cross Creek Circle
Freeeport, FL 32439
USA
Cell: (850) 502-9724