Rico Robinson

Rico Robinson

  • Criminal Law, Personal Injury
  • Missouri
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Summary

Rico Robinson leads Hale Robinson & Robinson, LLC's criminal litigation team, practicing all aspects of criminal defense. Rico was born and raised in the Kansas City area and has established a multitude of connections to the city and surrounding areas. Rico is dedicated to serving the community through exercising rights that are guaranteed by the courts and the Constitution. Rico understands that being accused of a criminal offense is a serious matter and should not be taken lightly. If you are being investigated for a crime or have been charged with a crime, your first and most important move is to obtain an effective criminal defense attorney. As an effective criminal defense attorney, Rico has a clear understanding of the criminal laws. Rico's clients are assured that he will achieve the best result possible for his clients.
Growing up as a youth in a high-crime inner city, Rico developed a profound obligation to fight for those who fall victim to their circumstances. Rico’s obligation to his community runs deeper than most and is exemplified through his zealous advocacy.

Practice Areas
  • Criminal Law
  • Personal Injury
Video Chat and Conferencing
  • FaceTime
  • Zoom
  • Google Duo
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Missouri
The Missouri Bar
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Education
University of Kansas School of Law
Activities: Member of Black Law Students Association Member of Hispanic Law Students Association
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Professional Associations
The Missouri Bar  # 72524
Member
Current
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Legal Answers
5 Questions Answered

Q. Is my son still eligible for child support?
A: Typically an obligation to pay child support support ends once the kid turns 18 in Missouri. However, there are some exceptions to this general rule, and attending college is one of them. In Missouri, if the kid enrolls in higher education, child support can run until the kid reaches the age of 21. As long as the kid remains enrolled in school and is enrolled in at least 12 hours, your son may be eligible for child support. Once he turns 21 or finishes school, which ever comes first, the support will typically end. **No attorney-client relationship is formed through interaction with this attorney on this public forum. The contents of any comment or response should be considered general conversational discourse on the topic identified and NOT specific legal advice or analysis that might apply to your situation. If you rely upon any part of the content of this response in making any decision or pursuing any course of action, you do so at your own risk and without recourse against this attorney or law firm
Q. Is it legal for my ex to register our children if I have already registered them for school where I live?
A: If you and your ex share joint legal custody, neither of you can unilaterally enroll the child in school without the consent of the other parent. If there has been a court order about where the child will go to school, you can a file motion to enforce. If you guys can't come to an agreement, you may have to litigate this issue unless there is already a parenting plan that stipulates where the child will go to school. No attorney-client relationship is formed through interaction with this attorney on this public forum. The contents of any comment or response should be considered general conversational discourse on the topic identified and NOT specific legal advice or analysis that might apply to your situation. If you rely upon any part of the content of this response in making any decision or pursuing any course of action, you do so at your own risk and without recourse against this attorney or law firm
Q. Hello, I have a question regarding the right to a speedy trial in Missouri. Is it true that you have to REQUEST it?
A: You are right in your assertion that you have a 6th Amendment right to a speedy trial, however there are 2 different concepts of a speedy trial. Procedurally, you do in fact have to request a speedy trial and the court should set a trial date as soon as it is reasonably possible. Once you relay to the court, through your counsel, that you are ready for trial, the State has a burden to proceed in a timely manner. Look up Missouri statute 545.780. The second concept of a speedy trial involves the 6th Amendment, but it is somewhat ambiguous about the specifics of that right, leaving it up for interpretation. There is no guidance as to what constitutes a "speedy" trial. The court will look at different factors to determine if a your rights have been violated.
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Contact & Map
Hale Robinson & Robinson
511 Delaware Street.
Suite 100
Kansas City, MO 64105
Telephone: (816) 679-1547
Monday: 9 AM - 5 PM
Tuesday: 9 AM - 5 PM
Wednesday: 9 AM - 5 PM (Today)
Thursday: 9 AM - 5 PM
Friday: 9 AM - 5 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed
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