Rhiannon Herbert

Rhiannon Herbert

Mansell Law, LLC
  • Employment Law
  • Ohio
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Summary

Rhiannon is an employment attorney with Mansell Law, LLC in Columbus, Ohio. Rhiannon represents employees in claims for wrongful termination, retaliation, discrimination, unpaid wages, and other issues.

Rhiannon believes early and frequent communication with her clients is essential to effective representation, and she regularly makes herself available by phone, text, or email, including outside normal business hours.

If you want serious representation from an Ohio employment attorney, contact Rhiannon at Rhiannon@MansellLawLLC.com.

Practice Area
  • Employment Law
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Ohio
Supreme Court of Ohio Office of Attorney Services
ID Number: 0098737
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Professional Experience
Attorney
Mansell Law, LLC
- Current
Law Clerk
Mansell Law, LLC
-
Education
Capital University Law School
J.D. (2019)
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Professional Associations
Ohio State Bar # 0098737
Member
Current
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Publications
Articles & Publications
Are Non-Compete Agreements Enforceable in Ohio?
Mansell Law, LLC
Are You Eligible for Medical Leave Under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)?
Mansell Law, LLC
Six Critical Steps to Take Before Filing an Employment Lawsuit
Mansell Law, LLC
Is Job Reassignment a Reasonable Accommodation Under the ADA?
Mansell Law, LLC
Employee vs. Independent Contractor: Which Are You?
Mansell Law, LLC
Should You be Paid for "On-Call" Time?
Mansell Law, LLC
Morrissey v. Laurel Health Care Company: Sixth Circuit Issues Favorable Opinion on Employee's Failure to Accommodate Claim
Mansell Law, LLC
What is a "Reasonable Accommodation" Under the ADA?
Mansell Law, LLC
When Happens to my Job Status if I Take FMLA Leave?
Mansell Law, LLC
When Does Time Clock "Rounding" Violate the Law?
Mansell Law, LLC
"Sleeping Her Way to the Top": How Female Employees May Have a Claim for Sex Discrimination Under Title VII Based on False Rumors About Sleeping with a Supervisor
Mansell Law, LLC
What is a Wrongful Termination in Violation of Public Policy Claim in Ohio?
Mansell Law, LLC
Everything You Need to Know About the Landmark LGBTQ Cases in Front of the Supreme Court Right Now
Mansell Law, LLC
Can an Individual be Liable for Unpaid Wages?
Mansell Law, LLC
Are you protected from discrimination if someone you care for has a disability?
Mansell Law, LLC
Legal Answers
23 Questions Answered

Q. Can my 12 year old work at a business sorting cans & bottles at a redemption center on weekends?
A: Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, the minimum age requirement for employment in any capacity is 14 years old. Thus, if your 12-year-old is looking to earn a wage performing these duties, he or she cannot do so yet.
Q. Hello - I reside in the state of Georgia, and I'm looking for assistance on employment agreements vs. handbooks.
A: Since you are an at-will employee, your initial offer letter is not an employment contract in that it doesn't create enforceable legal rights to benefits like PTO. As for the handbook, employers may change their PTO policies at any time, and the Fair Labor Standards Act does not require that employers offer or pay out any unused PTO at the end of your employment. The FLSA only requires that you be paid for the hours you actually performed work, and PTO is not included under the legal definition of "hours worked." So, unfortunately, there is no legal basis for challenging the non-payment of your PTO here.
Q. Hi There i was fired a week ago on saterday with out warning is this legal then was told 3 diffrent reasons i had no war
A: Colorado is an at-will employment state, meaning either you or your employer can terminate the employment relationship at any time, for any reason or no reason at all (as long as the reason isn't discriminatory). Unfortunately, this means that your employer does not need to give you any warning before you are terminated.
Q. I work part time and my boss told me I need to cut back hours. Can I legally tell him no and continue to work my hours?
A: The Fair Labor Standards Act does not impose any restrictions on the number of hours you are allowed to work as an 18-year-old high school student, so your boss is legally incorrect if he has told you your hours are limited based on your age. However, the Fair Labor Standards Act also does not guarantee employees any specific number of hours to work each week. If your boss ultimately decides to cut your hours, this act alone does not give rise to a legal claim against your employer.
Q. Question regarding compensation for tipped employees
A: Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, employers must ensure that tipped employees' hourly wage, combined with tips earned, equals at least the federal minimum wage of $7.25. If you didn't receive any tips during the hours the power was out but you were still required to be at work, your employer must pay you at least the federal minimum wage for each of these hours.
Q. I was fired for talking to another employee that quit about other places hiring. I was the only one fired over it.
A: Unfortunately, there is no violation here. You live in an at-will employment state, meaning either you or your employer can terminate the employment relationship at any time and for any reason or no reason at all (as long as the reason is not discriminatory). While it is unfair to you that you were fired for discussing this, it is not unlawful, as employers don't need a "good" reason to terminate the employment relationship.
Q. Do employers have to pay pto out when employee is fired? There was no handbook or contract about it
A: Unfortunately, no. Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, employers must compensate employees for all hours worked, but PTO hours don't count as "hours worked" since you did not spend this time working. The Fair Labor Standards Act also doesn't require employers to offer PTO.
Q. Hello, My wife was wrongfully terminated and we are looking to see if we have a case with her previous employer.
A: Unfortunately, there is no liability here. While your wife's termination is unfair, you live in an at-will employment state, meaning both the employee and the employer may terminate the employment relationship at any time for any reason or no reason at all (as long as the reason isn't discriminatory). While it sounds like your wife had nothing to do with this error, your employer need not have a good reason (or any reason) to support its decision to terminate her employment.
Q. Can you be fired for a work schedule change you weren’t notified of?
A: Unfortunately, there is no violation here. While this situation is unfair to you, you live in an at-will employment state, meaning you or your employer may terminate the employment relationship for any reason or for no reason at all (as long as the reason is not discriminatory).
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Contact & Map
Mansell Law, LLC
1457 S High St
Columbus, OH 43207
USA
Telephone: (614) 515-2885