Kirk Angel

Kirk Angel

The Angel Law Firm, PLLC
  • Employment Law
  • North Carolina, Tennessee
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Summary

Kirk J. Angel, attorney and founder of The Angel Law Firm, PLLC, is a native of Western North Carolina. He received his BA in Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Asheville. After graduating from UNC-Asheville, Mr. Angel attended the University of Tennessee where he received a Masters in Philosophy and his law degree in 1997. After graduating from UT, Mr. Angel practiced law with a small firm in Knoxville, Tennessee focusing his practice on employment law for employees as well as personal injury and worker's compensation. He returned to his home state to work as a Trial Attorney for the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in the Charlotte District Office. Mr. Angel handled litigation and worked on investigations throughout North and South Carolina while with the EEOC. Mr. Angel left the EEOC and opened The Angel Law Firm, PLLC in 2005. He focuses his practice on employment law for employees and local businesses (employers). He is rated AV Preeminent® by Martindale-Hubbell and 10.0 (Superb) by Avvo.com in the area of employment law.

Practice Area
  • Employment Law
Fees
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
    I accept contingency fees on some cases.
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    I offer low cost consultations and flat fee representation in many legal claims.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
North Carolina
Tennessee
Professional Experience
Founder
The Angel Law Firm, PLLC
- Current
Trial Attorney
United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
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Associate Attorney
Burkhalter, Rayson, & Associates, P.C.
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Education
University of Tennessee College of Law
J.D. (1997)
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University of Tennessee - Knoxville
M.A. (1997) | Philosophy
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University of North Carolina - Asheville
B.A. (1992) | Philosophy
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Legal Answers
125 Questions Answered

Q. Can an employer constantly text an employee after hours?
A: Yes. However, if the texts are work related and you are a non-exempt employees (one entitled to overtime), then the employer must pay you for that time spent on the texts. If you are an exempt employee, then the employer is not required to pay you for that time.
Q. Why was I denied although state psychiatrist deemed me unable to work stable job
A: This is posted in the Employment Law section, but I recommend posting it in the Social Security Disability section. I think it is imperative that you reach out to social security attorneys as soon as possible. I really cannot make a recommendation based on personal knowledge as I do not work with SSD attorneys. However, I believe the Lanier Law Group, 919-682-2111 handles these types of claims. You might want to reach out to that firm and others of your choice to see if they can help you.
Q. Hello, is it against the law for a manager to ask and have a discussion about my medications with my coworkers?
A: In this scenario, most like this is not unlawful. Employers with 15 or more employees are required to keep employee medical information once they receive such information from the employee or a third party on the employee's behalf (a doctor for example). However, asking about your medications is likely not unlawful by itself. Even so, if you are terminated, it could be evidence that your medical condition played a role. If the medical condition meets the definition of a disability under the ADA, there might be a claim.
Q. A former employer deposit funds in my account in error, am I obligated to repay those funds? What if I am unemployed?
A: The employer can file a claim to get those funds back. If they do, they will then try to collect if from you.
Q. Hi, I started working at a IGA store in my town where I noticed I was being underpaid the agreed wage rate.
A: If the employer is not paying you a promised wage, you can file a complaint for free with the North Carolina Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Bureau. Search online and their website will give you information on filing via phone.
Q. I am bullied daily at work. complained but no results. I have had severe emotional stress/suicidal thoughts. Can I sue?
A: Possible, but likely not. Workplace bullying is not unlawful in this state. The only time that you would be able to file a claim for bullying is if it arises to the level of unlawful harassment (pretty much synonymous with the term "hostile environment." Harassment is unlawful only if it is directed toward you based on a protected class such as race, color, sex etc. If it is not, then there might be some limited circumstances where you could sue the person who is bullying you for some form of emotional distress.
Q. Hello I am a 15 year old male and I feel like I am being sexually assaulted by an 18 year old male
A: Sexual harassment is complex. There are specific laws that prohibit sexual harassment in certain situations such as employment or education. If this is your co-worker, or boss, or a classmate, then there are specific laws that apply and steps you can take. However, if this is someone you know in a causal setting, then sexual harassment laws will not apply. Even so, there may be other laws such as those covering assault, battery or emotional distress, that would give you a legal claim. Aside from a civil portion, the actions he is engaging in may be criminal.
Q. I am paid on salary. If my boss asks me to stay longer than my shift to train without pay. If I left, could he fire me?
A: Yes, he can lawfully fire you for leaving. In fact, whether you are paid hourly or salary, non-exempt or exempt, you can be fired for leaving if your employer expects or demands that you stay beyond your shift. You mentioned a contract. If it is actually an enforceable employment contract, then there may be something in the contract that prohibits him from requiring you to stay over. If the contract does appear to address this issue, then you definitely consult with an experienced employment attorney who s/he can review the contract and advise you of your rights and responsibilities. If firing you or asking you to stay late is a violation of the contract, then you may have a breach of contract claim.
Q. NCDPS is sending a Letter of Overpayment when they terminated me, Didnt pay for a week of work or vacation leave.
A: I do not see a question. However, if you really were overpaid, then the DPS can institute legal action to get that money back.
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Contact & Map
Knoxville Office
213 E. Moody Ave.
Knoxville, TN 37920
USA
Telephone: (865) 297-4344
Concord Office
109 Church Street, N
Concord, NC 28025
USA
Telephone: (704) 706-9292
Fax: (704) 973-7859
Greensboro Office
204 Muirs Chapel Rd.
Greensboro, NC 27410
USA
Telephone: (336) 235-4004
Fax: (704) 973-7859