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Kenneth V Zichi

Kenneth V Zichi

Kenneth V . Zichi J.D.
  • Elder Law, Estate Planning, Family Law...
  • Michigan
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Summary

Helping Livingston County residents navigate the legal system for 30 years. I focus on Wills, Trusts, Estate Planning and Probate, with a significant portion of my practice also concerning Real Estate and general civil litigation. If you have questions or issues with your home, a cabin up north, or want to insure your family is cared for after you are gone, I'd be happy to meet with you, perhaps bust some myths, and certainly insure YOUR and your family's needs are met. Call for an appointment today!

Practice Areas
  • Elder Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Family Law
  • Insurance Claims
  • Landlord Tenant
  • Real Estate Law
  • Divorce
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    Telephone or office conferences, 20 minutes or less. Longer conferences may incur a minimal fee.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Michigan
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Owner
Kenneth V . Zichi J.D.
- Current
Mayor
City of Williamston (Michigan)
-
Education
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
J.D.
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University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
A.B. / History / Communications
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Honors: LS&A Honors College 1977-1979
Professional Associations
State Bar of Michigan
Member
- Current
estate and probate section Michigan bar
member
- Current
Law and Media committee - State Bar of Michigan
member
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Speaking Engagements
Newsroom Seminar, WNEM TV/AM - Saginaw MI
State Bar of Michigan - Law & Media committee
An hour-long seminar addressing some of the common practical and substantive difficulties journalists encounter in covering the legal system in Michigan.
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Website
Avvo.com
Legal Answers
441 Questions Answered

Q. i need a sample template for a TRO and affidavit supporting facts. I filed petition of will submitted based on fraud
A: You are essentially asking an attorney to provide you a form without you having the education to use it properly ... that isn't going to happen in a forum like this -- it would essentially be committing malpractice! You NEED legal advice. Temporary Restraining Orders are NOT simple, and are rarely successful unless there is a clear demonstration with LEGALLY ADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE (Not just allegations!) that irreparable damages will occur. If indeed the property is being sold, you can always get a share of the money later, so the damage is not irreparable. There needs to be more. I STRONGLY urge you to consult with a local attorney and HIRE him/her to represent your interests. There is a lot going on here and you need that guidance and help. You can't afford to NOT have an attorney in your corner, regardless of what you may feel about the cost. Don't be penny wise and pound foolish about this! --This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice!
Q. I purchased a piece of land, basically for my son. Both of our names are on the title - taxes are overdue, again.
A: Depending on how the property is held partition and forced sale MAY NOT be available. You ABSOLUTELY need to bring a copy of the deed with you to a local real estate lawyer who is well versed in Real Estate law to see what you can do. For example, if you hold as "Joint owners with full rights of survivorship" (or similar) as opposed to tennants in common you may not be able to state a claim that the Courts will grant relief on if you ask for partition, sale or similar relief. See Hrit v McKeon, (Mich App Feb, 2015), citing Wengel v Wengel, 270 Mich. App. 86, 2006. This is a VERY technical area of law, and it is easy to mis-interpret the statutes if you don't know the case law! Seek a local real estate lawyer to review the facts of your case! --This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice!
Q. how to protect a future inheritance from Medicaid
A: If 'she' will not need the money, the simplest way to deal with the situation might be to simply disclaim the inheritance and allow it to pass to others. There might also be other methods that will help, but the bottom line is that Medicaid WILL likely be able to assert a claim against money either received or which SHOULD have been received during her lifetime. Seek local representation to go over ALL the facts as there may well be other options available, or facts missing that would make my advice less useful too .... --This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice!
Q. In detroit if ur house is not registered as a rental propery do u still have to pay rent
A: If there is no 'certificate of compliance' for the property the tenant's obligation to pay rent can be "suspended" under the Detroit ordinance, but expect that if you do that there will be eviction proceedings and the City may well force you to move out. Consult with a local landlord tenant lawyer and understand what your options are. If you are concerned about your health or safety, it is almost always better to simply leave than to play games with withholding rent. If it is some minor maintenance issue, you should weigh your options carefully as doing the wrong thing can get you evicted with no place to live. See https://library.municode.com/mi/detroit/codes/code_of_ordinances?nodeId=PTIIICICO_CH9BUBURE_ARTIDEPRMACO_DIV3REREPR generally, but if you don't understand how to read an ordinance carefully (it is NOT something that is obvious, honest!) please seek local help! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. Can
A: It sounds like the bank is suggesting your sister needs to REOPEN the estate (with the courts) and then handle the check. There MIGHT be a simpler process depending on the size of the check etc, so I'd recommend consulting with a local attorney (the one who helped with the probate the first time?) to see the simplest way to accomplish what needs to be done. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. Can the entire residue of the property owned by me at death be bequeath to my living trust?
A: Sure, why not? You can (subject to some legal limitations about disinheriting spouses and minor children -- but if they are the beneficiaries of the trust that shouldn't cause issues) leave your property to whomever or whatever you want -- so long as it is not for illegal purposes. Your asking this implies you don't have an attorney helping you though, and THAT is a recipe for disaster. PLEASE consider hiring a local estate planning attorney to insure your wishes are carried out properly and you have ALL the documents you need to insure a smooth transition. Honest, you don't want to be penny wise and pound foolish here. Hire a local estate planning attorney to help! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. Single man, w/one adult daughter, committed suicide. No will. He is on house deed with 2 sisters. How do we remove him
A: If it is written as 'tenants in common' you will need to go through probate as to his share of the house. It will LIKELY end up being given to his adult daughter if he has no will, and she is is only heir (e.g. there is no surviving spouse). To get HER name off the deed, you will need to reach an agreement with her concerning a 'buyout'. I would strongly urge you to consult with a local real estate / probate attorney to review your options and determine what (if anything) you want to do here. This is a situation that NEEDS to be clarified before it gets even more complicated! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. My spouse and I were joint tenants on the deed to our house, he died in July and now the house is only my estate right?
A: I would urge you to consult with a local probate attorney. It SOUNDS as if the car and his bills might be the only assets and debts in the estate, but even that may not be right! It all depends on how things were titled, and whether or not there were beneficiaries on the assets. That is IF the title to the property really was a joint with rights of survivorship or some similar asset class. Be sure to bring your current deed to the attorney when you go for that consultation! This may be a 'classic' situation where you should step back, let the creditors fight over the car and need NOT be involved in the process. It may not be depending on other variables not mentioned. Seek local counsel! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. G'ma passed in NY; property/assets in GA; no assets in NY. Do I file for administration of the estate in NY or GA?
A: You MAY potentially need to do both if she LIVED in NY at the time of her passing. If she was simply visiting when she died, the probate will be necessary in the state she resided, and there MAY be a need to open an ancillary probate in the state where property is located if that state won't allow recording a 'foreign' order for probate. You need to consult with a local attorney (in BOTH locations potentially) to know how to proceed best, but it is impossible to know for sure without analyzing the WHOLE situation which is just not possible in a forum like this. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
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211 E Grand River Ave
Howell, MI 48843
USA
Telephone: (810) 299-5222
Cell: (517) 258-8020