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Kenneth V Zichi

Kenneth V Zichi

Kenneth V . Zichi J.D.
  • Elder Law, Estate Planning, Family Law...
  • Michigan
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Summary

Helping Livingston County residents navigate the legal system for 30 years. I focus on Wills, Trusts, Estate Planning and Probate, with a significant portion of my practice also concerning Real Estate and general civil litigation. If you have questions or issues with your home, a cabin up north, or want to insure your family is cared for after you are gone, I'd be happy to meet with you, perhaps bust some myths, and certainly insure YOUR and your family's needs are met. Call for an appointment today!

Practice Areas
  • Elder Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Family Law
  • Insurance Claims
  • Landlord Tenant
  • Real Estate Law
  • Divorce
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    Telephone or office conferences, 20 minutes or less. Longer conferences may incur a minimal fee.
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Michigan
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Owner
Kenneth V . Zichi J.D.
- Current
Mayor
City of Williamston (Michigan)
-
Education
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
J.D.
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University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
A.B. | History / Communications
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Honors: LS&A Honors College 1977-1979
Professional Associations
State Bar of Michigan
Member
- Current
estate and probate section Michigan bar
member
- Current
Law and Media committee - State Bar of Michigan
member
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Speaking Engagements
Newsroom Seminar, WNEM TV/AM - Saginaw MI
State Bar of Michigan - Law & Media committee
An hour-long seminar addressing some of the common practical and substantive difficulties journalists encounter in covering the legal system in Michigan.
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Website
Avvo.com
Legal Answers
705 Questions Answered

Q. Never signed a lease & living month 2 month. Now I have to pay!
A: A month to month lease would normally require notice equal to the term of the lease -- 30 days in other words. If the agent agreed to a SHORTER THAN ONE YEAR lease verbally, that however MAY be binding and not require additional notice. You NEED to talk to a local landlord tenant attorney to review the situation and determine if there is an 'out' here. If not, remember, your worse case situation is one extra month's rent. Consider that tuition to the school of life, and in the future remember, verbal agreements are worth the paper they are written on. Get it in writing! I'd advise you to consult with a local lawyer ASAP though. There may be a solution for you in the details. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. My Dad quit claimed his house to me before he passed, but there may be an issue with way it was worded...
A: PoAs expire on death -- you can't add 'in perpetuity' and expect that will change. And yes, a deed in Michigan that lists two or more people and does not specifically mention survivorship properly will revert to tenants in common and require probate when one of the parties dies. "Living Wills" deal with medical issues not real estate so to the extent one tries to do that it will be ineffective. At this point you need to get an attorney. Frankly, you needed that a LONG TIME AGO, but absent a time travel machine, we're stuck with the way things are now, and you need to get some real legal advice to avoid further messes like the one you describe. Seek a local probate attorney in the county where your father lived at the time he passed. If that is also the county where the land is located, you'll be all set. If he lived outside of Michigan, you may have a more complicated situation and need an attorney both in MI and in the state where he lived, but again, don't try to figure out what to do on your own. You need the help of a local professional. Don't continue to try the 'penny wise' and pound foolish approach here. Get local legal help. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. i have been renting an apartment for 2 years. original lease expires at the end of this month. a week ago I signed
A: If you signed and turned it into the landlord, and they agreed to the terms of the extension, you cannot simply 'back out'. You MAY be able to convince the landlord to allow you to pay a penalty and get out early, but that would be up to the landlord. Once you've agreed, and the other party has accepted the contract, you have a binding agreement. There is not a 'degree of bindingness' -- the contract is either binding or it is not. If there has been an offer and an acceptance and the terms of the agreement are spelled out completely, then the contract is done. If you have doubts, it may be worth consulting with a local landlord tenant attorney, but don't expect much. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. If I put in an offer and seller excerpts it can I change my my about the purchase My realtor told me I have to buy
A: You are right that nobody can FORCE someone else to buy something. HOWEVER, if YOU agreed to buy something then you CAN be required to live up to the deal you agreed to. That is not 'forcing' you to do something -- it is requiring that you do what you promised to do. This is why these agreements are done IN WRITING so the terms are defined and the agreements are binding on both parties. Turn this around, if you still wanted to buy and the seller changed their mind, how would you feel if they said "Nobody can force me to sell" .... Does this make the situation clearer? You ARE required to live up to the bargains you agreed to. If there is a problem other than 'I changed my mind' then maybe, but you'd need to consult with a local real estate attorney to know what, if anything, you can do. Don't take legal advice from a real estate agent -- hire your own lawyer. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. My son died without a will. I'd like to take over as guardian and take care of my grandchildren. What should I do?
A: Is the MOTHER still alive and capable? If so it is highly unlikely that you would be awarded guardianship. There is FAR more to flesh out as to what you SHOULD do however, and I'd urge you to consult with a local family law attorney to review all the facts of your situation and provide real advice! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. Can there be a contest of a will resulting in them being considered to have died intestate?
A: If a will is completely invalidated, that is the most likely result. HOWEVER, a contest that completely invalidates a will is difficult to prove in the extreme! To really answer this question, far more facts are necessary. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. How soon after a death will the probate process start? Is there any way to delay it?
A: There is no 'hard and fast' deadline, and how long things take to start depends a LOT on what there is to do. Delaying is rarely a good idea however, and you should consult with a local probate attorney to get real advice on what is appropriate for your case and why you need to do what you need to do! Don't be afraid of this, but you DO need answers, and that will require hiring or at least consulting with a local attorney. Use the find a lawyer tab here to locate someone nearby -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. My dad passed away and I'm a. Beneficiary of the estate in his will but my step mother wants me to sign off my rights
A: Spouses do have certain rights to 'elect against a will' but without full details it is impossible to say what the case here might be. You need to provide complete details in a private attorney-client privileged setting to get real answers to this. Many attorneys offer free or reduced cost initial consultations. Please search the 'find a lawyer' tab here to locate someone near you who can help! -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
Q. When exactly does a revocable living trust commence? Is it when the grantor passes or when the distribution is made?
A: It would 'commence' when the first item of property was transferred into the trust. The bottom line is that this is a pretty unusual wording and without seeing the WHOLE document, I'm not confident that my statement above is the 'final word' in interpreting the document. I'd strongly urge you to bring all the documents to a local estate planning / probate attorney to review and provide some real advice. This situation SCREAMS why trusts designed to 'avoid probate' often backfire, because if this is not resolved, you're going to end up in probate court to get a judge's ruling on what should be done anyway. And it will be MORE expensive than probate would have been in the first place in most cases. Seek local legal help ASAP. -- This answer is offered for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney/client relationship. I am licensed to practice in Michigan only. Please seek competent local legal help if you feel you need legal advice
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Contact & Map
1360 W. Grand River Ave
Howell, MI 48843
USA
Telephone: (810) 299-5222
Cell: (517) 258-8020