Kathryn L Hudson

Law in the Service of Others
  • Divorce, Family Law, Personal Injury...
  • Arkansas
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Claimed Lawyer ProfileQ&A
Summary

I became a lawyer later in life after experiencing first hand as a single mother and business owner how helpless one can feel in a judicial system that seems out of reach to all but those with endless resources. I know what it is like to be faced with the need for legal representation having limited resources and a judicial system that is too often dismissive of those with modest means. I made a vow to never forget how terrified and helpess I felt and how differently many things in my life might have been had I had someone advocating for my rights. To prepare for my career in law I chose one of the few Public Interest law schools in the country. Their motto of "Law in the Service of Human Needs" was how I thought the practice of law should be and in that spirit in my own practice - I have adopted "Law in the service of others" as my guide.

Practice Areas
  • Divorce
  • Family Law
  • Personal Injury
  • Civil Rights
  • Probate
Fees
  • Free Consultation
    Reduced rate for military and senior citizens
  • Credit Cards Accepted
    Visa, Mastercard, PayPal
  • Contingent Fees
    Personal injury and most civil rights cases are by contingency fee.
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Payment plan available
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Arkansas
Federal Circuit
Professional Experience
Owner
Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
- Current
We are a family oriented practice that doesn't treat you like a "case" or see you as a "billable hour," we know legal difficulties effect the entire family and we want to be the first you and your family call when the unexpected happens.
Education
Syracuse University
Graduate Studies History/Women's Studies (1999)
Honors: Teaching Incarerated Women
The City University of New York School of Law
J.D.
Honors: Vice President Criminal Law Society - Domestic Violence Fellowship Award
Syracuse University
B.A. / Political Science
Honors: Magna cum Laude
Professional Associations
Attorney
Arkansas Bar Association
Current
Active Member
National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers
Current
Active Member
Arkansas Trial Lawyers Association
Current
Active Member
National Association of Professional Women
Current
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Legal Answers
7 Questions Answered

Q. If you are 16 and pregnant can you move out with the father?
A: Unless you are legally emancipated from your parents or married, which requires parental consent, your parents are still your guardians and can enlist law enforcement or the courts to help them if they feel you are acting against your best interests. To be emancipated you have to file a petition with the court and serve notice on your parents, the court will want to see that you have a way of supporting yourself and a secure and safe place to live. Even with emancipation you will still be required to attend school. Have you discussed marrying the baby's father, if so your parents may consent to marriage.
Q. My son is in jail for aggrevated robbery. This is his 1st offense. Should he take it to trial. Offer is now 25 years
A: Without more information it is difficult to render an opinion. There are many factors that need to be considered before taking a plea offered by the prosecution, an attorney will review all the evidence the state has and must turn over to the defense in order to counter back to the prosecution with another alternative. Taking the case to trial of course has risk but when there is a prosecutor that refuses to budge it is often the only choice. If your son does not already have a private attorney you would be wise to do what you can to retain one for him. Public defenders are dedicated advocates but have heavy case loads and too often do not have the resources available to investigate the evidence and interview witnesses that when that evidence is shown to the prosecution often prompts them to reconsider their original offer.
Q. How can I give up all my rights to my child in arkansas
A: Generally a parent cannot relinquish their parental rights absent a dependency neglect action or a step-parent that stands ready and willing to adopt your child. Be aware that relinquishing your rights does not necessarily stop a child support order that is in place.
Q. How do I appeal a divorce decree?
A: You generally have thirty days from the date of the entry of the Order to file a Notice of Appeal. If you were not properly served with process the Court does not have personal jurisdiction over you and you can petition to have the divorce set aside and any Order void.
Q. How to file malpractice
A: Medical malpractice is a civil tort for personal injury and must be filed within a certain time limit after the injury occurs, in Arkansas the time to file is within two years of the occurrence or one year following the discovery of a foreign object being left in the body. A person that suspects that malpractice has occurred should consult attorneys that specialize in medical malpractice cases as medical knowledge and access to expert witnesses is very important. The success of a malpractice suit will depend on whether the doctor or healthcare professional acted outside the established "standard of care." Also, even if malpractice may have occurred, if there is no ongoing consequence that should be compensated the suit will not be successful.
Q. What activities if engaged in can make one liable for the offence of obscenity
A: The crime of obscenity is often challenged under the First Amendment because the definition of what is obscene depends on the standards of the community. The US Supreme Court definition of obscenity is "we know it when we see it." Any form of child pornography is the most obvious and carries very serious criminal penalties. Arkansas Code Annotated 5-68-303 says a person commits the felony crime of promoting obscene materials “if he or she knowingly promotes, or has in his or her possession with intent to promote, any obscene material.” This overly broad definition would include legal pornography covered under the First Amendment. So to answer your question, the answer is "it depends" on the activity, if the activity would offend the sensibilities of the reasonable person it could be a violation of the statute.
Q. Can a probation officer cOme to your house to arrest you
A: Generally being on "probation" is a sentence imposed for being found guilty or pleading guilty to a crime. Rather than serving a sentence incarcerated the defendant is allowed to serve their time under either supervised or unsupervised probation under the judicial system through probation departments that monitor the defendant to ensure they are complying with the terms of their probation. When one is on probation they are under judicial supervision and that means one's right to certain civil liberties are limited. One can be subjected to random searches, drug screens, and background checks without consent. If a person on probation violates the terms of the their probation their probation can be revoked and the original sentence of incarceration imposed. I took a long way to say yes, a probation officer can come into your house and arrest as they are officers of the law.
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Contact & Map
Attorney
650 S. Shackleford Road
Suite 400
Little Rock, AR 72211
USA
Telephone: (501) 246-3586