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Julie Swanberg

Julie Swanberg

Representing Colorado injured workers
  • Workers' Compensation
  • Colorado
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Summary

I am a sole practitioner who represents injured workers in their Colorado workers' compensation cases. I previously represented employers and insurance companies in workers' compensation cases for over 21 years.

Practice Area
    Workers' Compensation
Fees
  • Free Consultation
  • Contingent Fees
    Colorado allows workers' compensation attorneys to charge a fee of 20% of benefits awarded. Costs and expert fees are extra.
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Colorado
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Professional Experience
Sole practitioner, workers' compensation Colorado
Julie D. Swanberg, Esq.
- Current
I represent parties in Colorado workers' compensation cases. For the past 11 years, I have represented injured workers, but I have a total of thirty-three (33) years experience, both from the insurance defense side (21+ years) and the claimants’ side (11 years), from the beginning of the claims through appeals. Although I currently live in New Mexico, I only represent parties in Colorado.
Attorney Advisor
Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals
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Associate Attorney, Attorney Mentor
McDivitt Law Firm
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Mentored the firm’s five (5) workers’ compensation attorneys, personally handled the most complicated cases, helped put together workers’ compensation training program for attorneys and department staff
Head of Workers' Compensation Department
Franklin D. Azar & Associates, P.C.
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Head of the firm’s workers’ compensation department, representing claimants in all phases of their claims, from initiation of claim through final appeal and settlement.
Head of Workers' Compensation Department
Bendinelli Law Firm
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Head of the firm’s workers’ compensation department, representing claimants in all phases of their claims, from initiation of claim through final appeal and settlement.
Education
The University of Denver Sturm College of Law
J.D. (1987) | Law
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University of San Francisco School of Law
Law
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Professional Associations
Social Security Section, Colorado Bar Association
Member
- Current
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Colorado State Bar  # 17070
Member
- Current
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Workers' Compensation Section, Colorado Bar Association
Member
- Current
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Denver Bar Association
Member
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Legal Answers
8 Questions Answered

Q. I had a previous lumbar fusion that was not workmans comp. but now I hurt my lower back at work.
A: This new injury is a new worker's compensation claim against your current employer. You need to file a Worker's Claim for Compensation form (your HR person has it) ASAP and advised whomever you're supposed to tell about this new injury. The old injury/fusion may come into play later, but I wouldn't worry about it now. It is considered a "pre-existing condition," which was re-injured or aggravated by the new injury, and it is compensable.
Q. I am entitled to temporary partial disability?
A: Given that scenario, yes, you would be entitled to two thirds of the difference between your wages just before your injury and your wages now. Again, the 3-day waiting period (as it's called) applies.
Q. If I was injured and did not miss work, should I receive an admission of liability or denial from insurance co?
A: They don't have to file an admission of liability or a notice of contest unless you have lost the equivalent of 3 days or three shifts from work. If you are working fewer hours as a result of your injury, for example, if the doctor's restrictions say you cannot work as many hours as you used to, as soon as you accumulate 24 hours that you have not worked, that will trigger the insurance company's requirement to admit or deny liability. Presumably, you have kept track of how many hours fewer you are currently working than you were before your injury. If you are working fewer hours for any other reason, for example if the business has less need because of the season or something else, you probably would not be entitled to temporary disability benefits.
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Contact & Map
Julie D. Swanberg, Esq.
3311 Rio Fonda Ct. SW
Albuquerque, NM 87121
Telephone: (303) 475-4681
Fax: (720) 535-6334
Monday: 9:30 AM - 5 PM
Tuesday: 9:30 AM - 5 PM
Wednesday: 9:30 AM - 5 PM
Thursday: 9:30 AM - 5 PM (Today)
Friday: 9:30 AM - 1 PM
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed
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