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Joshua D. Brysk

Joshua D. Brysk

Cirrus Law PC
  • Business Law, Real Estate Law, Arbitration & Mediation ...
  • California
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Summary

Joshua D. Brysk advises clients on Business & Commercial Law, Debtor/Creditor, Estate Planning, Landlord/Tenant, Tax Law, and Wills, Trusts & Probate matters. He provides knowledgeable and skilled representation to clients in the East Bay and throughout Northern California.

With over 20 years of experience, Joshua is committed to providing unmatched personal attention and high quality legal advocacy. Helping clients avoid and solve their legal problems, Joshua's focus is always on achieving the best possible outcomes.

Outside of work, Joshua is a seasoned traveler. He has also enjoyed living and working in Australia and Israel.

Practice Areas
  • Business Law
  • Real Estate Law
  • Arbitration & Mediation
  • Landlord Tenant
  • Tax Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Probate
Additional Practice Area
  • Debtor/Creditor
Fees
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
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Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
California
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U.S. District Court Central District of California
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Languages
  • English
Professional Experience
Managing Attorney
Cirrus Law PC
Current
Education
University of San Diego School of Law
J.D. (1996)
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University of California - Los Angeles
B.A. (1987)
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Professional Associations
California State Bar  # 184200
Member
- Current
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Legal Answers
7 Questions Answered

Q. Can a mother disinherit her children if she lacks capacity? Also, is a will a type of contract?
A: If he is deceased and she is still living; his will gave everything to her--it is now hers to do with as she pleases regardless of what he wanted. A will is a special sort of document called a testamentary instrument. It requires capacity, so cognitive issues raise questions about validity. However, the competency requirement for wills is a very low bar. Essentially, as long as she understands the document, what it does, who her heirs are at the time she signs it, then it will be upheld.
Q. I inherited property from my parents. Then put it in a living trust. Both on title. Is it my sole property still?
A: "I inherited property from my parents. Then put it in a living trust. Both on title. Is it my sole property still?" If the property went into your name alone when you inherited it, then it was your sole property. Transferring a property into a revocable living trust makes it legally owned by the trust; if it is a typical estate planning trust and you are the beneficiary while you are living, then it is still your "sole" property. However, you said "Both on title" and I cannot tell what that means in this situation. Consult an attorney and provide context for your question to get a more specific answer.
Q. 2 brothers own 50% each of home, 1 brother signs quitclaim deed to remove name, does this reassess the property in CA?
A: There is no exemption for a sibling to sibling transfer, so you might be facing an increase in property taxes. However, the history of the title (e.g. if one brother added the other) and whether there is a joint tenancy (right of survivorship) could affect the analysis. you should consult with a real estate attorney to get an answer to your specific case.
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Contact & Map
Cirrus Law PC
6600 Koll Center Pkwy
#250
Pleasanton, CA 94566
Telephone: (925) 463-1073
Fax: (925) 463-2937
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