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Joseph Maya

Joseph Maya

Maya Murphy, P.C. - Representing Excellence.
  • Employment Law, Criminal Law, DUI & DWI ...
  • Connecticut, New York
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Lawyer Rating and Reviews
Legal Knowledge
5.0/5.0
Legal Analysis
5.0/5.0
Communication Skills
5.0/5.0
Ethics and Professionalism
5.0/5.0
Lauren A MacDonald
Reviewed by Lauren A MacDonald December 18, 2019
Rating: 10 Justia Lawyer Rating - 10 out of 10
Joe is an exceptional attorney with superior knowledge regarding complex employment law issues. He delivers advice effectively to his clients without sugar coating. Joe is one of the most hardworking and professional attorneys I have had the pleasure of working with.
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Summary

Our firm’s main areas of focus are employment law, divorce and family law, criminal law, litigation, estate planning, personal injury, education law, and business law.

All of our attorneys are licensed to practice in multiple states, including Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey.

Attorney Maya received his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School and his B.A., Cum Laude, from New York University. He began his career at Clifford Chance in New York City and he has practiced in the state and federal courts of New York and Connecticut. He is the Managing Partner of Maya Murphy. Mr. Maya was born in Brooklyn, New York and resides with his family in Westport, CT.

Call for your free consultation today!

Practice Areas
  • Employment Law
  • Criminal Law
  • DUI & DWI
  • Probate
  • Personal Injury
  • Education Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Family Law
  • Divorce
  • Elder Law
  • White Collar Crime
  • Arbitration & Mediation
  • Business Law
Additional Practice Area
  • Litigation
Video Chat and Conferencing
  • FaceTime
  • Google Hangouts
  • Skype
  • Zoom
  • FreeConferenceCall
  • GoToMeeting
  • WebEx
  • WhatsApp
Fees
  • Free Consultation
  • Contingent Fees
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Connecticut
State of Connecticut Judicial Branch
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New York
New York State Office of Court Administration
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Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
  • Spanish: Spoken
Professional Experience
Managing Partner
Maya Murphy, P.C.
- Current
Education
University of Michigan Law School
J.D. | Law
University of Michigan Law School Logo
New York University
B.A. | Politics
Honors: Cum Laude
New York University Logo
Awards
Peer Review Rated
Martindale-Hubbel Lawyers Service
Professional Associations
New York State Bar  # 2357648
Member
- Current
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Connecticut Bar Association
Attorney Member
- Current
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Publications
Articles & Publications
Cases in the News
Various Newspapers
Speaking Engagements
Litigation strategy and the use of technology , Litigation for the small firm
Certifications
Best Lawyer in America
Best Lawyers
Videos
Welcome to MayaLaw: your access to all the information you didn't know you needed to know. 

We appreciate your feedback, please like and subscribe. 

For more information on the legal... Welcome To MayaLaw

Welcome to MayaLaw: your access to all the information you didn't know you needed to know. We appreciate your feedback, please like and subscribe. For more information on the legal...

Attorney Ephraim Fink practices personal injury law at Maya Murphy, P.C.  He frequently assists individuals with personal injury claims who have suffered from dog attacks. Attorney Ephraim Fink on Dog Attacks

Attorney Ephraim Fink practices personal injury law at Maya Murphy, P.C. He frequently assists individuals with personal injury claims who have suffered from dog attacks.

Attorney Lauren MacDonald practices education law at Maya Murphy, P.C. She frequently assists parents and students with disciplinary issues, FERPA issues, bullying matters, special education issues, and private school contracts. Attorney Lauren MacDonald on Education

Attorney Lauren MacDonald practices education law at Maya Murphy, P.C. She frequently assists parents and students with disciplinary issues, FERPA issues, bullying matters, special education issues, and private school contracts.

Attorney Lauren MacDonald practices Employment Law at Maya Murphy, P.C. She frequently negotiates severance agreements, including non-competition and non-solicitation agreements, and handles wrongful terminations. Attorney Lauren MacDonald on Employment Law

Attorney Lauren MacDonald practices Employment Law at Maya Murphy, P.C. She frequently negotiates severance agreements, including non-competition and non-solicitation agreements, and handles wrongful terminations.

Inappropriate sexual conduct in the workplace is simply unacceptable. Connecticut law has strict repercussions for sexual harassment and can entitle you to just compensation. 

Contact the expert employment law attorneys... Connecticut Sexual Harassment Law

Inappropriate sexual conduct in the workplace is simply unacceptable. Connecticut law has strict repercussions for sexual harassment and can entitle you to just compensation. Contact the expert employment law attorneys...

There are situations when an employment relationship proves unfairly detrimental. Connecticut's Fair Employment Practices Act legally prohibits abusive exploitation and discrimination in the workplace. 

If you have questions or concerns... The Connecticut Fair Employment Practices Act

There are situations when an employment relationship proves unfairly detrimental. Connecticut's Fair Employment Practices Act legally prohibits abusive exploitation and discrimination in the workplace. If you have questions or concerns...

Connecticut's standard at-will employment is intended to offer both employers and employees flexibility in their working agreements. 

For questions of concerns regarding employment law, contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq., at... The Connecticut "At-Will" Employment Doctrine

Connecticut's standard at-will employment is intended to offer both employers and employees flexibility in their working agreements. For questions of concerns regarding employment law, contact Joseph C. Maya, Esq., at...

Welcome to MayaLaw: your access to all the information you didn't know you needed to know. 

In January of 2015, Connecticut implemented a substantial increase to decedent estate fees. Lawmakers... Connecticut Responds to Probate Fee Increase

Welcome to MayaLaw: your access to all the information you didn't know you needed to know. In January of 2015, Connecticut implemented a substantial increase to decedent estate fees. Lawmakers...

Welcome to MayaLaw: your access to all the information you didn't know you needed to know. 

The following video outlines the first steps of estate administration as set forth by... Connecticut Probate Law: Wills, Heirs, and Estate Administration

Welcome to MayaLaw: your access to all the information you didn't know you needed to know. The following video outlines the first steps of estate administration as set forth by...

-- Welcome to MayaLaw, your source for all the information you didn't know you needed to know. --

Some may argue that bullying is a rite of passage for students. That... Bullying in Connecticut Schools: What Are My Rights?

-- Welcome to MayaLaw, your source for all the information you didn't know you needed to know. -- Some may argue that bullying is a rite of passage for students. That...

Welcome to MayaLaw: your access to all the information you didn't know you needed to know. 

Divorce is a difficult process. Learning its fundamentals can allow you the best possible... Alimony: An Introduction to the Results of Connecticut Divorce

Welcome to MayaLaw: your access to all the information you didn't know you needed to know. Divorce is a difficult process. Learning its fundamentals can allow you the best possible...

Legal Answers
15 Questions Answered

Q. What are the guidelines for secondary education and the contribution by each parent in a divorced household in CT?
A: In Connecticut, educational support orders are governed by Connecticut General Statutes §46b-56c, which authorizes the courts to enter orders defining how parents will handle “necessary educational expenses” which include application costs, registration costs, room, board, dues, tuition, and fees up to the amount charged by the University of Connecticut for a full-time, in-state student at the time the child registers otherwise known as the “UCONN Cap.” The order may account for the cost of books and medical insurance for the child as well, and parents are permitted, upon agreement, to increase the limit beyond the amount charged by the University of Connecticut. Where parties are able to resolve their case amicably, college expenses may be addressed in one of two ways. First, the parties may simply include in their separation agreement a provision outlining in detail how they will divide such expenses. If the children are very young during the proceedings, and the parties’ circumstances at the time the child will be ready to attend college are unforeseeable, this issue may not be ripe for consideration. In such cases, the parties may wish to defer the issue until the child is older. It is very important to note that if the parties choose this course of action, they must include in their separation agreement a provision expressly requesting that the court retain jurisdiction over issues related to post-secondary educational expenses or it can be forever waived. Indeed, if they fail to do so, the court will not retain jurisdiction, and the parties will be precluded from seeking its involvement in the future. However, if the parties do request that the court retain jurisdiction, either party may request a post judgment educational support order at a later, appropriate time. Once such a post judgment petition for educational support is filed- as with the divorce itself- the parties may either resolve the issue by agreement or request a hearing for this limited purpose. It is important to note that whether a secondary or post-secondary educational support order is entered at the time of the divorce or post judgment, the court must find that it is more likely than not that the parents would have provided support to the child for higher education if the family remained intact. The parties may stipulate to this fact in an agreement, or leave it up to the court to decide. In either event, assuming that threshold requirement is satisfied, the court will then determine whether an educational support order is appropriate. In doing so, the court will consider all relevant circumstances, including the parents’ income, assets and other obligations; the child’s need for support based on his or her assets and ability to earn income; the availability of financial aid, including grants and loans; the reasonableness of the higher education considering the child’s academic record and financial resources available; and the child’s preparation for, aptitude for and commitment to higher education. Again, just like the underlying divorce action itself, the parties can conduct discovery in this post judgment proceeding to unearth the other’s pecuniary status and earnings. At a minimum, they will each likely have to file Financial Affidavits depicting the current snapshot of their income, expenses, assets and debts. Accordingly, the parties ability to pay is examined by the court to determine a fair and equitable contribution by each parent based on their financial circumstances. If you are referring to private high school tuition, the court will treat the issue the same way, particularly if the child had a history of attending private school. If not, the court may rule that neither party has to contribute to private school unless the child has special needs for such a placement.
Q. Can I get info on what the admin. is doing with my brothers estate? Can I find out his assets?
A: When a person who owns property dies in the state of Connecticut, the Probate Court facilitates and oversees the distribution of the property. If the decedent dies without a Will in place, often a family member or friend is appointed to settle the affairs of the estate. A part of the duties of the individual appointed to oversee the estate is to identify, gather and take control of the assets (as a fiduciary, rather than personally) so an inventory can be submitted to the Court. In the absence of a Will, the property is distributed to the next of kin, as defined by and pursuant to Connecticut law. Generally, in Connecticut, in the absence of a Will, an decedent’s net probatable estate will pass to his/her parents in equal shares in the event that there are no surviving spouse, children, or descendants. Prior to the distribution of any property, the Court will generally ensure that debts, funeral expenses, and taxes are paid. Family members and other interested parties may attend hearings at the Court to ask questions or state their positions on the issues addressed at the hearings. The court will notify all parties when a hearing has been scheduled. A court may send notice that a petition or motion has been received and indicate that the petition or motion will be granted unless an interested party requests a hearing. Notice of a hearing is required at the time each estate is opened and at the time the executor or administrator files a final financial report or account. Hearings may also be necessary at other stages of the proceedings. It is must be noted that in Connecticut, any assets that are held in joint name with the right of survivorship, generally become the property of the surviving title holder upon the death of the other party. While the assets often must be disclosed to the probate court, ownership will generally pass automatically without the need of a court order if they are titled in this manner. If you believe you did not receive notice of a hearing or you wish to request a hearing, you may contact the Probate Court about your concern.
Q. how does one apply to get to be a executor of the estate of their spouse so that they can get bank accounts in
A: In Connecticut, if bank accounts are held in joint name with the right of survivorship, they generally become the property of the surviving title holder upon the death of the other party. While the accounts often must be disclosed to the probate court, ownership will generally pass automatically without the need of a court order if they are titled in this manner. To the extent an individual is entitled to inherit assets from his/her spouse either by way of the terms of a Last Will and Testament or as a result of a spouse dying intestate, they need not be appointed as Executor in order to be eligible to inherit. In the event that anyone, including a spouse, wishes to become an Executor of an estate in Connecticut, the procedure depends on the terms of the operative Last Will and Testament, to the extent it exists. If they were appointed as Executor in the Will, they must submit the Will to the probate court with the appropriate documents to initiate the probate proceeding. If someone else was appointed in the Will, the individual must determine if that person has resigned from the role of Executor or intends to proceed as Executor. If the later, he/she may have to challenge the appointment. If there is no Will, the spouse can open a case in the probate court and petition to be Executor. The probate court in the district where the decedent resided can provide the appropriate forms to submit in either circumstance.
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Contact & Map
Maya Murphy, P.C.
266 Post Road East
Westport, CT 06880
Telephone: (203) 221-3100
Fax: (203) 221-3199
Monday: Open 24 hours
Tuesday: Open 24 hours
Wednesday: Open 24 hours
Thursday: Open 24 hours
Friday: Open 24 hours (Today)
Saturday: Open 24 hours
Sunday: Open 24 hours
Notice: Live Chat available 24/7 with live operators to answer legal questions. Our attorneys are available very early in the morning, late at night, weekends, and holidays. Your questions and concerns are important to you, and they are important to us to!
Maya Murphy, P.C.
261 Madison Ave
26th Floor
New York, NY 10016
Telephone: (212) 682-5700
Fax: (212) 682-5797
Monday: Open 24 hours
Tuesday: Open 24 hours
Wednesday: Open 24 hours
Thursday: Open 24 hours
Friday: Open 24 hours (Today)
Saturday: Open 24 hours
Sunday: Open 24 hours
Notice: Live Chat available 24/7 with live operators to answer legal questions. Our attorneys are available very early in the morning, late at night, weekends, and holidays. Your questions and concerns are important to you, and they are important to us to!
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