Jason C Palmer

Jason C Palmer

Palmer Law, PLC
  • Trademarks, Intellectual Property, Business Law
  • Tennessee
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Practice Areas
    Trademarks
    Trademark Litigation, Trademark Registration
    Intellectual Property
    Business Law
    Business Contracts, Business Formation, Business Litigation, Franchising
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Tennessee
Board of Professional Responsibility of the Supreme Court of Tennessee
ID Number: 036146
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Education
Vanderbilt University Law School
Law
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College of William and Mary
B.A. | Government
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Professional Associations
State Bar of Tennessee  # 036146
Member
Current
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Publications
Websites & Blogs
Website
Palmer Law, PLC Website
Blog
Trademark Prose
Legal Answers
10 Questions Answered
Q. Can I change my cause of action?
A: Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 15(a) explains that a party may amend its pleading once as a matter of course if done so within 21 days after the service of a responsive pleading or Rule 12(b) motion to dismiss. If the motion to dismiss is the only filing the other party has made, you can amend your complaint as a matter of course by filing an amended complaint with the Court. You should also check your local rules and the rules of your presiding judge to ensure you don't run afoul of those.
Q. how do I trademark a logo and name in a specific industry?
A: Trademarking anything only requires one thing: use. When you use a mark in connection with goods or services to identify the source of those goods or services, you have trademarked that mark as long as (1) the mark is trademarkeable, and (2) no one else already owns that mark (or a similar one).

Trademarking a mark is different than obtaining a registration for that mark. While you might own a mark by virtue of using it, registering the mark with your state or with the USPTO will afford you additional protections for your trademark. To register your mark with your state, visit your Secretary of State's website. To register your mark federally with the USPTO, consult an attorney to determine whether you're allowed to do so. Then, complete a registration application through the USPTO's website. An experienced attorney can help you prosecute your trademark application to improve your chances of receiving a registration. ... Read More
Q. How do I trademark a logo and brand name?
A: Trademarking anything only requires one thing: use. When you use a mark in connection with goods or services to identify the source of those goods or services, you have trademarked that mark as long as (1) the mark is trademarkeable, and (2) no one else already owns that mark (or a similar one).

Trademarking a mark is different than obtaining a registration for that mark. While you might own a mark by virtue of using it, registering the mark with your state or with the USPTO will afford you additional protections for your trademark. To register your mark with your state, visit your Secretary of State's website. To register your mark federally with the USPTO, consult an attorney to determine whether you're allowed to do so. Then, complete a registration application through the USPTO's website. An experienced attorney can help you prosecute your trademark application to improve your chances of receiving a registration. ... Read More
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Contact & Map
Palmer Law, PLC
3908 Lebanon Pike
Unit 828
Hermitage, TN 37076
Telephone: (615) 434-6270
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