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Isaac Shutt

Isaac Shutt

Dallas, Texas wills, estate, probate, fiduciary litigation attorney
  • Probate, Estate Planning, Elder Law
  • Texas
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Summary

Attorney Isaac Shutt focuses his law practice on Wills, Legal Trust creation, Probate Law, and help with Estates, primarily in Dallas County and Collin County Texas. He is passionate about assisting families with the necessary legal process to distribute property after the death of a family member. Mr. Shutt genuinely cares for every client and strives to make Wills, Probate, and Estate Administration as affordable and simple as possible.

Mr. Shutt’s Qualifications And Memberships:
Isaac Shutt is licensed to practice law in the State of Texas.

Southern Methodist University, Dedman School of Law, juris doctor, Cum Laude
Southern Methodist University, Bachelor of Arts, Magna Cum Laude
Member, State Bar of Texas
Member, State Bar of Texas – Real Estate, Probate & Trusts Law Section
Member, The College of the State Bar of Texas
Member, Collin County Bar Association
President-Elect, Probate Section, Collin County Bar Association
Attorney ad litem appointment list in Dallas County and Collin County Probate Courts
Past President, Richardson Community Band
Concert Chair / Vice-President, Richardson Community Band
Member, Richardson Chamber of Commerce
Member, Richardson Chamber of Commerce – Leadership Richardson Alumni Association
Member, Murphy Chamber of Commerce
Personal Details About Mr. Shutt:
Mr. Shutt is a Christian and part of the community of Dallas Bible Church.

Outside of the law practice, Isaac enjoys spending time with his wife, Jessica, and his three young sons, Dean, Vaughn and Duke. Isaac is also Vice-President of the Richardson Community Band. Other interests include woodworking, motorcycle riding, working on cars, traveling, and sports (especially the SMU Mustangs). Click here to read more about Mr. Shutt’s hobbies.

Mr. Shutt was raised in Wichita, Kansas. He attended Southern Methodist University for both undergraduate and law degrees.

Practice Areas
  • Probate
  • Estate Planning
  • Elder Law
Additional Practice Areas
  • Wills
  • Power of Attorney
  • Guardianship
  • Fiduciary Litigation
Fees
  • Free Consultation
  • Credit Cards Accepted
  • Contingent Fees
  • Rates, Retainers and Additional Information
    Shutt Law Firm uses Flat-Rate Attorney Fees for many Probate Cases and for Wills
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Texas
State Bar of Texas
ID Number: 24071203
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Education
Southern Methodist University
J.D.
Professional Associations
Texas State Bar College
Current
Collin County Bar Association
President-Elect
- Current
Publications
Articles & Publications
The Top Troubles with “DIY” Wills
Headnotes (Dallas Bar)
Speaking Engagements
Panelist, North Texas Probate Bench Bar
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Legal Answers
5 Questions Answered

Q. If a probated will was filed and recorded on July of 2018 can it be protested on April 2019?
A: Yes. You get two years from the date of the original probate hearing to contest the will. It's important to file your contest ASAP, because a lot of the property may get transferred to the beneficiaries named in the "will." So, you want to try and contest the will quickly so you can prevent additional assets from disappearing. The Special Warranty Deed can be put on pause through the filing of a "lis pendens" in the real estate record, after your attorney files the will contest. This lis pendens helps prevent the property from being sold. Definitely call a probate attorney with experience in will contests. Many of us will offer free or inexpensive consultation meetings.
Q. Does a no contest clause in a will cover the executor of the will ?
A: Meet with a probate lawyer ASAP. Many probate lawyers offer a free (or inexpensive) consultation meeting. The wording of the no-contest clause is important. However, and this is probably even more important, the no-contest clause cannot be used as a shield for the executor's wrongdoing. There are some new probate cases that establish this. In other words, in cases like yours where the executor did something wrong (like misappropriating funds), even if the will says that you can't challenge the executor, you CAN still challenge the wrongdoing of the executor. To make a long story short, you really should meet with an attorney. People try to use those no-contest clauses as a shield for their wrongdoing, but there is law to prevent this.
Q. How do i evict deceased father's live in girlfriend from his home?
A: You will need to probate his will first, if he has a will. If he has no will, then you'll need to do a "determination of heirship." Either way, you'll either want or need a probate attorney to assist you. After the above is completed, you can file for eviction.
Q. My parent died intestate. I’ve been told Texas law allows stepparent to lifetime rights to live in house.
A: If you're looking the the tax rolls (the CAD record), then that may be your problem. The tax rolls often merely show who gets the tax bill, not necessarily the true owner. You would need to look at the actual deed record to see if someone filed a deed or something that purportedly changed the actual ownership to the property. In Texas, title to houses is not like a title to a car. There's not a tingle document showing who owns the house. We just a chain of title, which goes from owner to owner all the way back to the dawn of time. THAT'S what you'd want to look at to see if the stepparent had filed something bad. The good news is that it's actually pretty easy to search the actual deed records, now that those records are available online.
Q. My Dad was an attorney. He passed away. My Step mom forged signature and notaries are her employees. Help!?!?
A: You definitely need to talk with a probate lawyer to give some more details. It sounds like you may have a good case for a "will contest." With that type of case, many attorneys describe a "race to the courthouse," which means you have a better case if you act quickly. This is because there's a shift in who has the legal burden after the probate hearing. The quicker you can file into the court case, the lower the legal burden you'll face. When you look for an attorney, search for someone who focuses on probate law and has experience with disputed cases. Your attorney does not have to be in the Tyler area. Many attorneys can assist you after meeting with you by phone and email.
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Contact & Map
Shutt Law Firm, PLLC
1701 Gateway Blvd
Suite 333
Richardson, TX 75080
USA
Telephone: (214) 302-8197
Fax: (214) 382-9437