David N Soloway

David N Soloway

  • Immigration Law
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Summary

David N. Soloway is a principal in Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, P.C. He graduated from Emory University School of Law (’82) and Duke University (’79). His immigration law experience includes arguing Ardestani v. INS before the U.S. Supreme Court (1991), a case of national importance addressing the applicability of the Equal Access to Justice Act to certain types of immigration cases. He currently is Chair of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) Chapter covering Georgia and Alabama, has served on the Chapter’s Executive Committee since 2008, and has served as Chair of the Chapter’s Liaison Committee with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. David is admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals, Federal District Court (N. Ga.), the Immigration Court, Board of Immigration Appeals, and State and Superior Courts. Avvo, an organization that rates attorneys nationwide, ranked David 10.0/Superb (the highest rating). He is a member of the Board of Directors and Executive Committee of the Interfaith Children’s Movement, Inc.

Practice Area
  • Immigration Law
Education
Emory University School of Law
J.D. (1982) | Law
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Duke University
B.A. (1979)
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Professional Associations
American Immigration Lawyers Association
Member
- Current
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State Bar of Georgia # 666788
Member
- Current
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American Immigration Lawyers Association - GA/AL Chapter
Chair
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American Immigration Lawyers Association - Atlanta Chapter
Vice Chair, Secretary, Treasurer and USCIS Liaison Committee Chair
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Websites & Blogs
Website
Firm's website
Legal Answers
7 Questions Answered

Q. For lack of time, can I provide a single letter of affidavit of birth from my mother to prove place & date of birth?
A: The U.S. Department of State has identified which documents are acceptable as birth records, according to such things as the geographical location where a person was born and the date of birth. This takes into account that some nations or regions did not keep regular centralized birth records, some geographical areas had their records destroyed by natural disaster or war, some nations or regions have unconventional ways to maintain birth records, etc. The only way to know which records will be acceptable for you would be to know the geographical location and date of your birth. In keeping with Justia policy, this communication is intended as general information and not legal advice, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. David N. Soloway Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, PC Atlanta, Georgia www.fspklaw.com dsoloway@fspklaw.com
Q. Name change on green card help!!!
A: Congratulations upon being approved for Permanent Resident status. Generally, when a woman becomes married and desires to embrace her husband's last name as her own, the law will recognize that new name without any necessity for filing a marriage certificate or taking other steps to accomplish the name change. From an immigration legal standpoint, having the USCIS issue a replacement "Green Card" with your husband's last name shown as your last name, will not be consequential for your ability to continue to be a Permanent Resident or to become eligible to apply for naturalization. If you decide to seek a replacement "Green Card," be prepared for the USCIS to take a long time to complete its responsibilities. In keeping with Justia policy, this communication is intended as general information and not legal advice, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. David N. Soloway Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, PC Atlanta, Georgia www.fspklaw.com dsoloway@fspklaw.com
Q. Married to permanent resident! How long will it take generally for me to be granted with one as well?
A: A Permanent Resident may marry someone who is in F1 student visa status and then petition for him/her in the Family-based Second Preference (F2A) visa category. Visas are now available in that category for people from most nations who have a Priority Date (application filing date) of September 1, 2013 or earlier. While that does not necessarily mean that a visa will become available in less than two years for a newly filed case, that at least provides some guidance about the approximate amount of time. In keeping with Justia policy, this communication is intended as general information and not legal advice, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. David N. Soloway Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, PC Atlanta, Georgia www.fspklaw.com dsoloway@fspklaw.com
Q. Green card expires and I have a felony
A: There really is no substitute for engaging an immigration attorney who, after learning all of the relevant information about your arrest/conviction will be able to advise about eligibilities, options and strategies. In keeping with Justia policy, this communication is intended as general information and not legal advice, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. David N. Soloway Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, PC Atlanta, Georgia www.fspklaw.com dsoloway@fspklaw.com
Q. My husband had a working visa before getting his green card through our marriage. Does he needs to change his passport?
A: Having an expired visa in one's passport is inconsequential when the person seeks to re-enter the U.S. with a valid passport and Alien Registration Card (a "Green Card"). In keeping with Justia policy, this communication is intended as general information and not legal advice, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. David N. Soloway Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, PC Atlanta, Georgia www.fspklaw.com dsoloway@fspklaw.com
Q. My husband is blind and we need help going back and forth running errands can we sponsor a relative to help.
A: Various types of family-based visas exist, and eligibility for each is specified in the applicable statute and regulations. None of them, however, create special considerations for a relative whose help may be needed for the type of assistance mentioned in your question. It would be wise to engage an immigration attorney who, after learning all of the relevant information about the people involved, would be able to advise about eligibilities, options and strategies. [Consistent with Justia policy, this communication is intended as general information and does not constitute legal advice and it does not create an attorney/client relationship.] David N. Soloway Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, PC Atlanta, Georgia www.fspklaw.com dsoloway@fspklaw.com 404-320-7000 ext 3
Q. Will My Stalking Conviction Prevent My Fiance From Obtaining K1 Visa?
A: In general, a U.S. citizen's criminal arrest/conviction history will not stand in the way of succeeding with a K-1 application for a fiancee. In some instances where the victim was a minor child, however, immigration authorities may bar a U.S. citizen from a family-based petition, but that bar may be subject to a waiver. In keeping with Justia policy, this communication is intended as general information and not legal advice, and it does not create an attorney-client relationship. David N. Soloway Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, PC Atlanta, Georgia www.fspklaw.com dsoloway@fspklaw.com
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Contact & Map
Frazier, Soloway & Kennedy, PC
1800 Century Place
Suite 100
Atlanta, GA 30345
USA
Telephone: (404) 320-7000