David Allan Nelson

David Allan Nelson

  • Personal Injury, Workers' Compensation, Construction Law...
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Summary

Attorney Nelson has an impressive criminal trial record having accomplished not guilty verdicts in many cases, including a stretch of seven not guilty verdicts within a span of ten trials. He has successfully had cases dismissed after getting courts to suppress illegally obtained evidence. He is passionately dedicated to the aggressive protection of constitutional rights and liberties. In representing injured and disabled client's he has obtained numerous successful results, including a $627,000 jury verdict in an automobile collision case in Milwaukee County following a week-long trial. In December of 2014 he got a Washington County Jury to award $150,000 in damages to his client on a premises liability case following a 3 day trial. He has accomplished favorable settlements for injured clients in the areas of automobile collision, medical malpractice, dog bite, premesis liability, personal tort, products liability, and breach of contract. He represents several local area business entities with their litigation needs. Attorney Nelson Attended Verona High School where he was named the captain of both the baseball and football team. He attended the University of Wisconsin Platteville where he played football, receiving four letters as a running back. Following a study abroad Summer program in London and Cambridge England he graduated from Marquette Law School in 1999. He met his wife Magdalen at Gesu parish in Milwaukee while she was also receiving her RN degree at Marquette. They have four children, Anna, Teresa, Joseph, and Maria. Attorney Nelson is currently the President of the Board of Directors for the Youth & Family Project Inc., and is a member of the St. Joseph's Hospital Ethics Committee. He is the past president of the Washington County Bar Association. Attorney Nelson races road bicycles throughout the Midwest for Team Extreme Racing. He also enjoys golf, chess, swimming, and spending time with family. Attorney Nelson is a member of the Nation

Practice Areas
  • Personal Injury
  • Workers' Compensation
  • Construction Law
  • Criminal Law
  • Divorce
  • DUI & DWI
  • Employment Law
  • Family Law
  • Juvenile Law
  • Landlord Tenant
  • Municipal Law
  • Medical Malpractice
  • Nursing Home Abuse
  • Products Liability
  • Social Security Disability
Education
Marquette University Law School
J.D. (1999) | Law
Awards
2014 Customer Favorite
Avvo
Top 40 Under 40
The National Trial Lawyers Association
Professional Associations
State Bar of Wisconsin # 1033988
Member
Current
Washington County Bar Association
Past President
Current
National Trial Lawyers Top 40 Under 40
- Current
Wisconsin Association of Justice
- Current
Wisconsin Acadamy of Criminal Defense Lawyers
- Current
Legal Answers
2 Questions Answered

Q. Can you get probation consecutive to extended supervision
A: A sentence of probation or extended supervision should not be imposed to (start) following an existing period of probation or extended supervision. A sentence of incarceration, jail time, or prison time, can be imposed to be served after the completion of an existing incarceration period. If a new crime is committed, that crime can involve a new bifurcated sentence that involves initial confinement and extended supervision. However the new sentence would not involve probation or extended supervision that begins following the completion of an existing probation or extended supervision, but would rather involve the new sentence simply being imposed as is (possibly with probation or extended supervision as a component) and that time would begin running immediately, possibly running concurrently with an existing probation period or extended supervision period effectively lengthening the time that the person will now be on probation or extended supervision. However one probationary period does not begin upon the other one ending.
Q. How come they charged my son as an adult at age 17
A: Although it might seem unfair Wisconsin law declares that all persons charged with a crime who have obtained the age of 17 will be charged in adult court. You might not be old enough to purchase tobacco, but you are an adult at the age of 17 if charged with any crime. The legal system can often be slow moving, and we don't want to see adult defendants litigating cases in juvenile court. Some other serious crimes are tried in adult court prior to the age of 17. In these cases there might be a waiver hearing to determine whether or not the case will be heard in adult court. If a prosecutor intentionally waits until a person turned 17 to charge them, that person should file a motion challenging the charges.
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Contact & Map
Hetzel & Nelson LLC
411 N. River Rd
West Bend, WI 53090
USA
Telephone: (262) 334-4700