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Christopher C. Carr

Christopher C. Carr

The Law Offices of Christopher C. Carr, MBA, P.C.
  • Bankruptcy, Business Law, Consumer Law...
  • Ohio, Pennsylvania
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Summary

I am a Federally designated Debt Relief Agency Attorney, with experience in Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, Chapter 13 Bankruptcy, Mortgage Modification, Debt Settlement, Fair Debt Collection/Debtors Rights. I also work in Small Business, Intellectual Property (including software licensing and entertainment law) and Elder Law.

I take a compassionate view on all problems presented to me and many of my clients past and present have become personal friends.

I am also an MBA with several years of practical experience as a Financial Planning Analyst with the NCR Corporation and this background provides me with unique insights into the economics of law which most attorneys simply do not have.

Practice Areas
  • Bankruptcy
  • Business Law
  • Consumer Law
  • Foreclosure Defense
  • Intellectual Property
Fees
  • Free Consultation
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Ohio
Pennsylvania
3rd Circuit
Education
Ohio State University - Columbus
J.D.
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Ohio State University - Columbus
MBA | Finance
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Honors: Beta Gamma Sigma
Ripon College
B.A. | Philosophy
Honors: Phi Beta Kappa
Boston University
Professional Associations
Pennsylvania State Bar # 46249
Member
Current
Certifications
Cert/MIS
Penn State University
Websites & Blogs
Website
Website
Legal Answers
1 Questions Answered

Q. Im in my 4th year of a chapter 13 & plan & arrears on mortgage are current. can i keep my escrow surplus check?
A: Dear Reader: Since you are four years into the plan, it is obvious that the overpayment is a post petition asset. This being so, it is derived from property of the bankruptcy estate and your post-petition income. That income constitutes property of the estate under 11 U.S.C. § 1306(a)(2). The question which then arises is "who is entitled to the property interest so created: the Trustee or you?" 11 U.S.C. § 1306(b)makes it quite clear that unless otherwise treated in your confirmed plan (unlikely), you as the debtor in possession are entitled to the property. Should you consult legal counsel or the standing trustee to assist you with this matter?. Well, it is always your choice to do so but were I you, I would not: the former course would involve payment of legal fees to get to the same answer as above and the latter is at best unnecessary. Your hard earned money funded the escrow in the first place so now enjoy the refund!
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Contact & Map
3240 Tyning Lane
Downington, PA 19335
USA
Telephone: (610) 380-7969