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Anna Summersett

Anna Summersett

Board Certified Criminal Specialist and Former Prosecutor with Five-Star Reviews
  • Criminal Law, DUI & DWI, Domestic Violence
  • Texas
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Summary

Anna Summersett is Board Certified Criminal Law Specialist. This means she has achieved the highest designation possible for a criminal defense attorney, and she has been recognized as one of very few attorneys who can call themselves experts in the area of criminal law.

Anna Summersett is an experienced criminal trial attorney who has personally handled over 100 jury trials ranging from misdemeanor DWIs to Capital Murder.

As a partner at Varghese Summersett PLLC, Anna primarily handles State Criminal Cases from post-arrest investigation through jury trial. She is rated a top attorney in client satisfaction.

Anna graduated from Baylor University as a member of the Baylor Debate Team with a BA in Political Science and Minor in Argumentation Rhetoric. She then attended Texas Wesleyan University School of Law (which became Texas A&M University School of Law) where became nationally recognized as a Moot Court Advocate.

After completing internships with the United States Attorneys Office, United States Federal Magistrate Charles Bleil, Texas Attorney General's Office, and the Tarrant County District Attorney's Office, Anna became a criminal prosecutor at the Cameron County District Attorney's Office and ultimately an Assistant District Attorney with the Tarrant County District Attorney's Office.

Practice Areas include:
Sexual Assault: https://goo.gl/z6QWzc
DWI: goo.gl/zqfRL1
Criminal Defense: https://tinyurl.com/ybns55ym

To see some of Anna Summersett's results, visit https://www.versustexas.com/results/

Practice Areas
  • Criminal Law
  • DUI & DWI
  • Domestic Violence
Additional Practice Areas
  • Sexual Assault Defense
  • Homicide Defense
Fees
  • Free Consultation
  • Credit Cards Accepted
Jurisdictions Admitted to Practice
Texas
U.S. Supreme Court
Languages
  • English: Spoken, Written
Professional Experience
Partner
Varghese Summersett PLLC
- Current
With over thirty years of combined experience, our lawyers handle state criminal charges and federal criminal defense cases ranging from DWI arrests to Capital Murder trials. We are Tarrant County criminal defense attorneys you can trust with the most serious charges. Whether you were just investigated, arrested, charged, indicted or convicted, we are here to help.
Assistant District Attorney
Tarrant County District Attorney's Office
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As a former Tarrant County prosecutor Anna handled over 100 jury trials ranging from misdemeanor DWIs to Capital Murder.
Assistant District Attorney
Cameron County District Attorney's Office
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Post-Bar Intern
Tarrant County Judicial Staff Counsel
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Extensive legal research for memos to advise Tarrant County Judges on legal issues pre and post conviction.
Post-Bar Intern
Tarrant County District Attorney's Office
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Assisted numerous Assistance District Attorneys with pre-trial investigation, plea negotiation preparation, and trial work.
Post-Bar Intern
Tarrant County District Attorney's Office
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Assisted numerous Assistance District Attorneys with pre-trial investigation, plea negotiation preparation, and trial work.
Intern
Office of the Attorney General of Texas
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Assisted Assistant Attorney Generals with various legal research issues.
Intern
United States Attorney's Office for the Northern District of Texas
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Assisted numerous federal prosecutors with various legal research tasks.
Education
Texas Wesleyan University School of Law - Texas Wesleyan University
J.D. / J.D. (2009)
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Honors: Order of the Barristers, Best Oralist Upper-Level Moot Court Competition, Best Oralist 1L Moot Court Competition, Regional Moot Court Caption, 2nd Place Appellate Brief National Criminal Procedure Moot Court Competition, 3rd Place Oralist National Criminal Procedure Moot Court Competition, Law Fellowship Award, Advocacy Scholarship
Activities: Moot Court, Mock Trial, Board of Barristers
Baylor University
B.A. / Political Science & Argumentation Rhetoric (2006)
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Honors: Blake Withrow Best Public Speaker Award, Outstanding Student in Political Science, Presidential Scholarship Award
Activities: Baylor Debate Team, Kappa Kappa Gamma
Awards
Advocacy Scholarship
Thompson & Knight, LLP
Blake Withrow Best Public Speaker Award
Baylor University
Best Oralist
Texas Wesleyan University School of Law
Upper-Level and 1L Moot Court Competition
Professional Associations
Litigation Counsel of America
Member
- Current
National Association Of Criminal Defense Attorneys
Member
- Current
Texas Board of Legal Specialization
Board Certified Attorney
- Current
Activities: There are over 70,000 attorneys licensed to practice in Texas. Only 7,000 have earned the right to be publicly recognized as Board Certified specialists in one of 21 select areas of law. The Texas Board of Legal Specialization was established in 1974 by the Supreme Court of Texas at the request of State Bar of Texas and is the only governing board authorized to certify attorneys in legal specialty areas.
State Bar of Texas # 24066813
Member
- Current
Tarrant County District Attorney's Association
Member
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Tarrant County Bar Association
Member
-
Certifications
Board Certified Criminal Law Specialist
Texas Board Of Legal Specialization
Legal Answers
89 Questions Answered

Q. Im a student following a case. A man accused of 1st degree felony for sexual abuse to a child
A: This can happen for any number of reasons. First, both the State and the Defense have a right to a jury trial. If the State chooses not the waive that right, then the defendant is set for jury trial regardless of whether he desires to plead guilty or not guilty. Jury trials are generally high-risk, high-reward situations; especially in sexual assault cases where children are involved as a finding of guilt could result in serious pen time and registration as a sex-offender. Before a jury trial, a defendant may go through a number of pre-trial settings where the State can make plea bargain offers. Such offers can be low to encourage a defendant to plead a weaker case, offering less time than they could expect to receive from a jury if convicted; or such offers can be high because the State believes a certain punishment should be reached given the severity of the case and strength of their evidence. In cases where a plea offer is made by the State, defendants and their attorneys may choose to go to trial because they believe the evidence is insufficient to result in a finding of guilt, but they may also choose to proceed to trial because they believe, even if found guilty, their punishment will be less severe from a jury than it would be if they accepted the plea offer. For example, if someone is charged with a First Degree offense, their punishment range, if convicted, would be 5 years to 99 years or LIFE. This punishment range can go even higher depending upon the specific allegations or prior criminal history of the defendant. So, if a prosecutor offered 4 years, to a reduced offense, that would encourage a defendant to plead rather than try their luck with a jury. On the other hand, if a prosecutor offered 50 years, the defendant would be encouraged to proceed to trial and try their luck with a jury, regardless of how strong or weak their case may be. Sometimes, things can happen during the trial phase of a case, such as pre-trial motions or voir dire where a jury is selected, that encourage one side or the other to adjust their expectations and resolve a case. Because the State has the burden of proof in all criminal cases, preparing for trial, calling witnesses, paying experts, gather exhibits, can be time-consuming and expensive. As such, it is unlikely that the State will "fold" and make a reduced offer once a trial has started. They would be "pot committed" as some may say. If a case is pled during trial, it could be because the trial has taken an unexpected turn, for one reason or another, that could cause the State to question their confidence in the outcome; whether it be the verdict or ultimate punishment. Ever heard, "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush?" A plea bargain guarantees an outcome for both sides and avoids what can be a lengthy and difficult trial for witnesses, attorneys, and jurors alike.
Q. My son is in jail on a $50,000.00 bond. How do I go about getting him a bond reduction.
A: Generally, a magistrate sets the initial bond. This may or may not be writhing the bond schedule proposed by local District Judges. Once the case is filed, your attorney can present a Motion to Reduce the bond down to the bond schedule or in line with what the defendant can afford. The bond should be high enough to produce a financial incentive for the defendant to appear in court but not so unreasonable that the defendant could not afford it under any circumstances. The Judge will consider the defendants ties to the community, severity of pending charge, criminal history, and any other risk that could lead to flight. Contact a local, experienced defense attorney for assistance.
Q. a 14 year old girl gets pregnant by her 16 year old boyfriend and he turns 17 in a couple of months will he be charged
A: This will question will come down to consent. A 14 year old and 16 year old can be in a consensual relationship in Texas as their ages are within the 3-year allowance. If, however, this relationship was not consensual, prosecution could be appropriate. You can learn more about this offense here: https://www.versustexas.com/sexual-assault-child-17-texas/
Q. The Father to my unborn twins, who is on parole assaulted me and charged with 3rd degree felony of C.F.V.
A: I am terribly sorry to hear of your situation. Any new offense could be a violation of his parole and he will likely already have a HOLD to answer to the Pardon and Parole Board. A trial on the current offense can proceed in a variety of ways, but likely the prosecution will want you to testify to successfully prosecute. If you ever feel in danger, make sure your local police department and prosecuting attorney are aware.
Q. My bf just got his 7th DWI,what are the chances he could just get probation? If not,how much jail time or anything else?
A: A seventh DWI would put your boyfriend in a felony range of punishment. Even at two or more prior convictions, he is looking at a Third Degree Felony DWI-Repetition with a range of punishment 2 years to 10 years. If he has a prior felony conviction, not only is he not eligible for probation, but his punishment range could be increased. You will need to contact an experienced criminal defense attorney who regularly handles DWIs to assist. Good luck!
Q. If you get a first offense dwi is a 120 days to much if you don't having any prior alcohol related offenses.
A: If you do not have a prior felony conviction, then probation should certainly be an option. What jurisdiction you are in will be a big deciding factor in what an appropriate sentence is. Contact a local, experienced DWI attorney for assistance.
Q. I have a friend who was at a bar in Texas drinking. Another party said that he moved his car in the parking lot.
A: I am terribly sorry to hear this. He will need an experienced DWI attorney to help gather evidence such as this witness statement and present it to the prosecutor. A criminal case must be proven Beyond a Reasonable Doubt and it sounds like your eye-witness account could certainly create a problem in the state's case.
Q. Is there a set time an interlock device can be put in your car?
A: If Interlock is required as a condition of your bond, occupational license, probation, or final conviction, you should be advised by the court on the time limit you have to install the vehicle. It can be 7 days, 10 days, or even 30 days depending on the Judge's ruling. Contact a local, criminal defense attorney to assist. Failure to comply could result in a warrant for your arrest or revocation of your occupational license. You can learn more here: https://www.versustexas.com/criminal/ignition-interlock-device-requirements-texas-creates-distinction-preconviction-essential-licenses-postconviction-occupational-licenses/
Q. What do I need to do, if I'm on probation and I get a DWI?
A: If you are currently on probation, one of your conditions is to not commit an offense against this or any other state. A DWI arrest would be an allegation that you did just that. It is possible, and even likely, that your probation department will file a Motion to Revoke or Adjudicate your probation for this violation. Such a filing would result in a warrant for your arrest and a hold without bond. You will need to contact an experienced, local defense attorney to assist you in these matters. You can learn more about revocations here: https://www.versustexas.com/criminal/probation-revocation/
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Contact & Map
Varghese Summersett PLLC
300 Throckmorton, Suite 1650
Fort Worth, TX 76102
USA
Telephone: (817) 203-2220
Fax: (817) 203-2220